Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Excerpt, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

Rosemary or Too Clever to Love G.L. Robinson 4*#Review @gl_robinson @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours #RegencyRomance #BlogTour #BookReview #HistoricalRomance #Rosemary

The Ugly Duckling meets the Gothic novel: a plain governess, a romantic Miss, a stern but handsome guardian, involved in a midnight chase, a woman dressed in britches and a gloomy castle. Throw in a bit of Vivaldi and some French philosophy, and you have it all!

If Rosemary can’t control her wayward pupil and prove her worth to her guardian the Earl, her future is bleak.

When Marianne’s father dies, she and her governess Rosemary are forced to go and live with her guardian the Earl of Tyndell. The Earl has strict ideas about how young ladies should behave. He isn’t impressed by the romantic notions Marianne has absorbed straight from the pages of a Gothic novel. And her governess is not only dowdy but perfectly ready to put him in his place, especially regarding his ideas about the education of women. But when the Earl’s interest in Rosemary blossoms just as Marianne falls in love with the last person he would ever agree to her marrying, where will it all end?

Read Rosemary or Too Clever to Love to see how this tangle is sorted out.

In spite of its light-hearted and often humorous tone, this charming novel raises questions about women’s education and philosophy. Book Group discussion topic have been included at the end.

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I received a copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

This is a traditional styled Regency Romance featuring Rosemary. Rosemary comes from a genteel, impoverished background and is forced into service to survive. Marianne her charge becomes the ward of the mysterious Earl of Tyndell, on her father’s death and the two women face an uncertain future.

The novel explores the role of women in Regency society and their lack of power. Rosemary is well-educated, and this makes her unusual in Regency society. The chemistry between Rosemary and Giles the Earl is slow-burning but allows the emotional connection to keep pace with the physical attraction. This is a gentle romance with witty dialogue and unrequited feelings that are enjoyable.

Character-driven this story concentrates on the present with only necessary information on the characters’ backgrounds. The story is engaging and romantic.

Excerpt from Rosemary Too Clever to Love

G.L Robinson

Rosemary and Marianne put on a play Rosemary has written about Mary Queen of Scots in a ruined chapel in the grounds.

On the day of the performance, the footmen had carried all the chairs from the ballroom downhill to the ruins, the maids had swept the chancel of bird droppings and leaves and the cook had finally filled her baking pans when, about midday, they received the devastating news that the two young men would be unable to perform. They had that morning been indulging in their favorite pastime of running along the top of the walls that flanked the Hardcastle estate, when they had been surprised by a pheasant shooting from its covert and had fallen headlong into a large bed of tall stinging nettles. Their hands and faces, and more particularly their eyelids, had been quite viciously stung, and all the application of mashed dock leaves in the world had not reduced the swelling. The doctor had been called and had advised their remaining quietly in their beds with the blinds down and cold compresses on their eyes. He had given them a small dose of laudanum and they were presently sleeping. There was no possibility of their performing that day.

It was impossible to change the arrangements. People would be arriving in under three hours. With Marianne wailing and her head in a spin, Rosemary made a rapid decision. Luckily, she had kept both young men’s costumes at High House, not trusting them to remember them. She sent a note to Mrs. Hardcastle, asking her to send over a shirt and britches, possibly something Jasper had grown out of. She would play the parts herself. When she told Marianne what she had decided, that young lady was torn between gratitude and being scandalized.

“You’re going to appear in public in britches?” she gasped. “But, but… how will you change?” She looked horrified.

“Don’t refine upon it dear,” replied Rosemary with more calm than she felt. It will just be for a moment. I just have to wear the britches for Bothwell. He’s the only one seen in normal men’s clothing. And as for changing, I won’t have to, really. I shall go down to the ruins in the britches under my Darnley shroud, with my cloak over all. I shall go behind one of the pillars and take off my cloak. I can play Darnley, then I have only to remove the shroud to play Bothwell. That’s the only time I’ll be seen in britches. Afterwards I’ll don the apron for the Executioner. It will work, I assure you. The good news is that his lordship told me yesterday he will not be able to see the play, as he has urgent business with one of his tenants. Something to do with flooding after all this rain. I was a little disappointed, but now I’m delighted. Say nothing to him, for heaven’s sake!”

Marianne was sufficiently reassured to be able to face his lordship later without a tremor, and when he offered his apologies for missing the performance, said with tolerable equanimity, “Oh, it’s only a silly amusement for children, after all! You may be happy to be missing it.”

The time for the performance arrived. The performers hid behind the chapel pillars and the audience took their seats. The servants from High House stood behind the chairs. They had been agog at all the preparations and what they had seen of the rehearsals. They had obtained the housekeeper’s permission to leave their posts to watch the play, provided they hurried back to serve the guests at tea.

Rosemary rang a bell she had borrowed for the purpose. When the audience quieted, Marianne came forward and announced the title of the piece, then arranged herself on a low draped table serving as her bed. Her head up, as she had been instructed, Mariah walked across as the silent chorus with her notice, and they were off. Rosemary had powdered her hair and face. She dropped her cloak behind a pillar and stepped forward in her shroud. There was a little stir, as it became clear who was playing the part, but it soon quieted as she spoke out in a low, carrying voice. With a dignified gesture, she accused Mary of murdering her.

The Smythe boy came next and did well, hesitating a little at first, but then speaking out boldly and clearly. During that time, Rosemary quickly stripped off the sheet. As she bent to step out of it and to shake the powder from her hair, she was observed from behind by the Earl, who had completed his business more quickly than expected and had returned with more enthusiasm than he would have imagined to see the entertainment. He strode swiftly down the hill, quite by chance approaching at an angle that allowed him to see behind the pillar where Rosemary was effecting her change. He did not at first realize what he was seeing, but then recognized her and stopped abruptly to admire her shapely derriere as she bent in the rather tight britches, for Mrs. Hardcastle had sent over a pair that Jasper had long outgrown. Luckily, Rosemary did not see him, or she would have hesitated before slipping into the embroidered doublet and jamming the feathered hat upon her head. As it was, she came onto the stage and carried off the part of Bothwell with enormous verve, her tone insinuating and insulting, a complete contrast to Darnley. The audience, by now into the story, certainly recognized her, but they were too entranced by the performance to wonder at it.

It was only as she was leaving the stage that her eye fell upon the Earl and her heart gave a leap. Whether she was glad to see him, or embarrassed that he saw her, she could not afterwards tell, and anyway, she was too busy changing herself into the Executioner to think about it. Queen Elizabeth and her lady made their entrance. After all their histrionics during rehearsals, the twins were inclined to look down and fail to project, until Rosemary hissed at them to look at the audience and for the queen to speak up. Mariah crossed the scene for the third Act, and the trial and execution scenes began.

Without telling the other performers, Rosemary had arranged that there would be a pan of red paint behind the black draped stool that served as the execution block. When the axe, a realistic looking instrument with a blade made of heavy card fitted onto a broomstick, came down to cut the head three times, this, by historical account, being the number of strokes required to sever Mary’s head, it came up with red along its blade. There was a collective gasp, both from the audience and the other actors. Then, before raising the severed head, a gory affair made of papier mâché, she dipped it in the pan too, so that when she held it aloft, it dripped in a lifelike grisly fashion. One or two of the housemaids screamed and the audience murmured in delicious horror.

The performance was greeted with enormous acclaim. The Smythes were delighted with their lad’s performance and, ignoring or forgetting the hours Rosemary had spent with him to get him to stand up straight and enunciate clearly, seemed to think it was all his own doing. Mrs. Pendleton was pleased with her daughters in spite of their lackluster performance, while Mr. Pendleton was pleased with the sight of Rosemary in britches. Like the Earl, he had not failed to notice her bottom. He sought her out, but she, quickly donning her cloak and running up the hill, managed to avoid everyone. She went straight to her bedchamber, quickly brushed the rest of the powder out of her hair and changed into a gown. By the time she came down again, the guests had gathered in the drawing room and the tea was being brought in.

“Ah, Miss Drover,” remarked the Earl, seeing her. “I hope you will act as hostess and pour the tea?” he made no mention of the britches.

Rosemary was both astonished and flattered. She had planned to ask Mrs. Hardcastle to act as hostess. She knew that by asking her, his lordship had elevated her status in the household. She inclined her head and went immediately to the silver pots of tea and hot water. She was glad to do it, less for the distinction it gave her, than because it prevented her having to deal with all the questions and comments that her performance would inevitably bring. She had already noticed Mr. Pendleton eying her with light in his eye she did not like. She heard the word britches whispered around the room, usually with sidelong glances at her, but Mrs. Hardcastle wasted no time in describing the accident that had befallen the two male actors, loudly commending Miss Drover for not allowing it to prevent the play from going forward.

Rosemary kept her eyes on the teapots and the maids distributing the cups, until the novelty of her performance appeared to wear off. By the time she was forced to join the guests, as usual on these occasions, the women were sitting in groups chatting about domestic issues, while the gentlemen stood together, talking of horses, farming or world affairs. However, she was not to escape so easily.

“Here is our heroine!” announced Mrs. Hardcastle, and there was a round of applause.

“Jolly well done!” pronounced the General. “I must say, I didn’t realize it was you under that sheet until later when you appeared in those britches. They never looked better, I dare say!”

The General obviously thought his social standing was so impeachable that he could say what he liked. There was a slightly embarrassed murmur from most of the gentlemen, though Mr. Pendleton was heard to mutter “here, here,” and the ladies had the grace at look at the floor, all except Mrs. Mannering, who looked at Rosemary with patent dislike.

“It’s lucky Rosemary knew all the lines, because she wrote the play,” cried Marianne, instinctively recognizing that her companion somehow needed protection, “and she worked out so quickly how she could play all the missing parts. I think she’s amazing!”

“And I think my fellow actors deserve most of the credit for continuing as if nothing were amiss” said Rosemary, smiling at Marianne and glad to be able to deflect the conversation from herself. “We must thank them all for their hard work and dedication, not excluding the poor young gentlemen who are lying abed and missed it all. Tell us, Mrs. Hardcastle, ma’am, how were they going on when you left?”

Thus she diverted the conversation, and his lordship, who was not enjoying the oblique references to the charms of a woman he unaccountably was beginning to think of as his own, took the opportunity to announce that sherry or Madeira was available for the gentlemen who preferred that to tea. He was certainly one of them.

I’m a product of a convent boarding school in the south of England in the 1950’s and early 60’s. You can probably guess I received an old-fashioned education. I learned a great deal about the humanities and practically nothing in the sciences. I understand Latin, speak French fluently and my German isn’t bad. I read the Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English when I was 16 and Shakespeare is an open book. But the only science I remember is the ditty: Miss Cummings (our teacher) was a scientist, alas she is no more, for what she took for H2O (water) was H2SO4 (sulfuric acid). Not bad, eh? Words to live by.

I met my American husband while working in Brussels (Belgium). Then we moved to Bonn (Germany).  I had three children in a foreign tongue. If you want to know how to say “push” in French and German, ask me!

I’ve lived in the USA for over 40 years, have seven grandchildren and the same husband I started with. We live in a small town in upstate New York but nowadays spend the winter in Florida. I need to sell lots of books so we can buy a waterfront condo! (laughs ironically).

I love my garden, telling my grandchildren stories and eating desserts.  I’d give up a steak for a Key Lime Pie any day!

I began writing Regency Romances just under two years ago after the death of my beloved sister who was in the convent with me all those years ago. We used to read them under the covers with a torch after lights out. My books are dedicated to her.

I’ve so far indie published three.  The third, Rosemary or Too Clever to Love, just came out at the beginning of May.  I’m writing a fourth and editing a trilogy I wrote 18 months ago. I plan on publishing them over the summer.

I love Regency Romances and they’ve always been a guilty pleasure. I was a French professor, and I tell you, after a day of teaching Existentialism, you need a bit of sprigged muslin and some polished topboots to clear your head.  

But more than that, I think they fulfil a need for order and calm that is so lacking in our lives today.  You know that Almack’s is only going to allow entry to men in white britches; you know young ladies may only dance twice with the same man at the ball; you know the couple is going to get together, no matter how mismatched they appear, or how many obstacles are in their path.

There is something soothing about it all.  Of course, it’s escapism and it’s often silly, but it’s always satisfying.

Having been a teacher for 30 years, I find I can’t get away from the urge to provoke discussion. Plus, I belong to three Book Groups. I’ve therefore included Discussion Topics at the end of my last two novels. I hope my readers will have fun with them. 

Posted in Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

4*#Review- Annie Burrows A Duke in Need of a Wife @MillsandBoon @NovelistaAnnie

A search for a duchess 
…despite his scandalous secret!

Oliver, Duke of Theakstone, needs a duchess—but who will accept his secret illegitimate child? He invites several eligible ladies to his estate to assess their suitability, including infuriating beauty, Miss Sofia Underwood. Oliver is a master of cool practicality, so he’s hopeful when he sees the connection between Sofia and his daughter. What scares him is that there’s nothing cool or practical about his attraction to Sofia!

Amazon UK


I received an electronic advanced reader copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A charming Regency romance, based on the marriage of convenience trope. Sofia has lived with her guardians, her paternal aunt and uncle since she was a young girl, they looked after her, but she never felt loved, and so became an independent spirit, something frowned on by Regency society.

Oliver, the Duke of Theakstone, is looking for a wife, to raise his illegitimate daughter, who he cares for, but doesn’t know how to love. His meeting with Sofia is unusual, and it sets the scene for an unconventional romance.

An enjoyable read, with some poignant moments and a deepening romance between Oliver and Sofia. Livvy, Oliver’s daughter and Snowball, Sofia’s dog are great characters, who give the story a humorous dimension.

A lighthearted, Regency romance, which lets you escape to a more romantic era, for a little while.

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The Rise and Fall of Becky Sharp -Sarra Manning- 5* Review

Posted in Book Review

5* Review – Janice Preston – Lady Olivia and the Infamous Rake

‘He’s completely unsuitable…
he’s a rake.’

Part of The Beauchamp Heirs: After being plucked from peril by resolute bachelor Lord Hugo Alastair, Lady Olivia Beauchamp is secretly outraged that he doesn’t even try to steal a kiss! He’s a notorious rake amongst the ton and as a result, utterly forbidden to an innocent debutante like her. But their attraction is magnetic. Will she risk her reputation for a passionate encounter?

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My Thoughts…

 A lovely, Regency romance with an innocent, impetuous heroine, a reformed rake and all the hustle and bustle of Regency England that makes this a must for lovers of this romantic era.

Olivia is easy to like, and as she loses her heart, you feel her exasperation and pain. Hugo is the archetypical dissolute rake, but his chance encounter with Olivia, has him questioning his lifestyle and finding out that underneath his ‘devil may care’ attitude he may have a heart.

There is romance, an engaging Regency setting, a desperate villain and simmering passion, a perfect escapist read.

I received a copy of this book from Mills& Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Posted in Book Review

A Lady Becomes a Governess – Diane Gaston – 4* Review

A most unlikely governess……with a shocking secret.

Lady Rebecca Pierce escapes her forced betrothal when the ship she’s on wrecks. Assuming the identity of a governess she believes has drowned, she enters the employ of brooding Lord Brookmore, who’s selflessly caring for his orphaned nieces. Inconveniently, she’s extremely attracted to the viscount, with her only chance of happiness tied to the biggest risk: revealing the truth about who she really is… 

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 My Thoughts…

Rebecca and Claire meet on a packet boat sailing to England from Ireland. Rebecca is a lady travelling to London for a forced marriage to a man she despises. Claire journeys to a new post as a governess in the Lake District. A devastating shipwreck leaves few survivors, Rebecca is one and as there is no sign of her new friend Claire she assumes her identity and becomes a governess.

Lord Brookmore is an unwilling Viscount, but his sense of duty makes him a selfless guardian for his two orphaned nieces and a dedicated custodian of the Lake District estate. The attraction between the Viscount and his governess is forbidden but inevitable, they both fight it but despite scheming fiancees, dangerous former employers and a disapproving housekeeper they fall in love. The historical detail sets the romance firmly in the Regency era, and the two little nieces make clever cupids.

The ending is action packed and full of menace but fortunately a well deserved happy ending and an unexpected twist.

I received a copy of this book from Mills & Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Posted in Book Review

The Duchess Deal Tessa Dare 5* Review

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My Thoughts…

‘The Duchess Deal’, is the first Regency romance I’ve read in a couple of years. A clever mix of humour and poignancy laced through with sensual romance, Ash and Emma’s story is the perfect weekend read.

The Duke of Ashbury’s reclusive life is disturbed when desperate seamstress, Emma demands payment for his ex- fiancee’s wedding gown. From their first meeting, you can tell that Emma is a strong, independent woman, ready to defy convention and risk all to ensure her survival. Ashbury believes her intrusion to be serendipitous and wastes no time in making her an unlikely offer, he is brusque, haughty and hurting and the marriage of convenience he proposes riddled with rules designed to protect his already battered heart and self-esteem.

The couples unlikely romance is aided and abetted by Kahn, the butler and Mary, the ladies maid and indeed the whole of the Duke’s staff at his London residence. They want to see the Duke happy and believe Emma is the perfect match for him.

Painfully disfigured from a horrific war injury Ashbury’s prickly nature is exacerbated, he shuns society and human contact and has only allowed the marriage of convenience to get an heir; enabling him to honour his father’s memory and fulfil his duty to his tenants. Emma sees the man beneath the scars, moved by his sense of responsibility and caring nature. Falling in love will make her vulnerable and is something she can’t afford to risk, but is it already too late?

The plot has good pacing, the necessary twists and lots of humour, which counterbalance the angst the couple experience, as they battle their internal demons and external nemeses to get their happy ever after.

Emma’s friendship with an unusual set of ladies gives her courage as she fights to understand her complicated husband, I look forward to reading about their lives in later books.

The Duchess Deal is an engaging, lively, sensual Regency romance with delightfully flawed, likeable characters and a lovely balance of laughter, kisses and tears.

I received a copy of this book from Mills & Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

Posted in Book Review, New Books

5* Review: The Secret Love of a Gentleman – Jane Lark (The Marlow Intrigues #5)

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Blurb - Coastal
How could Caro love and hate the same man? How could she be foolish enough to harbour that love for years; to hide herself away from the world because of her embarrassment over her failure to be loved in return? Because she is a fool… Yet Rob Marlow sees not that but courage in her, and this beautiful young man, who gives her back the strength she’s lost is someone she longs to cling to for the physical comfort she has missed since the end of her marriage.

Integrity, idealism and honour are at the heart of Rob Marlow, and yet he knows that perhaps pride is his weakness, but he thought it his only possible weakness until he spends a summer with his sister and discovers a new addiction, Caro, his brother-in-law’s dependent sister

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My Review - Coastal

The Secret Love of a GentlemanIn ‘The Secret Love of a Gentleman’, Caro and Rob are not the archetypical ‘Regency Ton’ couple, for many reasons, including a disparity in their ages. Caro has fled a troubled marriage and now survives as a dependant of her brother, Drew. Rob is a younger son, who is desperate to make his own way in life and he lives in the shadow of his elder step-brother John, the Duke of Pembroke.

In common with some of the main characters in the ‘Marlowe Intrigues’, Caro is a victim of abuse. Her story is sad and colours her future life. Many of Rob’s problems are rooted in low self -esteem. He is not an arrogant, alpha hero but has many fine qualities; intelligence, loyalty, respect for women, which were uncommon in Regency society and make him a likeable hero.

The plot has enough twists to make it interesting and Caro’s former husband is a well written antagonist. The secret antagonist in the story is the inner battle; both Caro and Rob fight to justify their feelings and actions. There is plenty of overt action, to accompany the internal battles and a real flavour of the two sides of Regency society.

Past characters from other stories in the series, make frequent appearances, so this book is easy to read as a standalone. However, if this is your first ‘Marlow Intrigue’ book, it won’t be the last; the characters, plot and vivid details make it an addictive and original historical romance series.

I received a copy of this book from Harper Impulse via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

The Secret Love of a Gentleman by Jane Lark
My rating: 5 of 5 stars


The Secret Love of a Gentleman by Jane Lark

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4* Review: The Desperate Love of a Lord – Jane Lark ( Marlowe Intrigues #2.5)

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Historical Blurb

Fiercely independent, Lady Violet Rimes, the merry widow, has played the town, dangling men from leashes like a pack of adoring hounds, always the one in control. She has never let a man toy with her.

An idle, attractive rake, Lord Geoffrey Sparks has had little to do other than enjoy life. He has let Violet play her games for months without complaint, because he likes her company—and admittedly her bed. But in recent months he’s found himself gravitating towards her more and more. Things have changed between them. He likes her for who she is and not simply the notorious widow. He thought his feelings were returned, but . . . Why then has she suddenly vanished from town without a word?

A couple of months ago, she’d complained about his friend being a heartbreaker, but now Violet is breaking his heart…

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Historical My Review

The Desperate Love of a Lord (Marlow Intrigues, #2.5)I loved the character of Lady Violet Rimes in ‘The Passionate Love of a Rake’, despite her scandalous ways she always seemed a little sad. In this novella, Violet’s secrets are revealed and they prove too damning, even for her to brazen out, amid the ‘haute ton’.

This short story has all the emotion, heartache and passionate romance, you find in the longer stories but it is faster paced and more focused on actions and consequences than inner emotional turmoil.

It reads perfectly well as a short stand alone tale but is far more enjoyable if you have read the previous book in the series.

This story is an interesting expose into the hidden secrets of Regency society with a strong female lead and an alpha hero who has to change his ways to win her heart.

This novella is free to read from Harper Impulse.

The Desperate Love of a Lord by Jane Lark

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


The Desperate Love of a Lord (Marlow Intrigues, #2.5) by Jane Lark

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4* Review: The Hour of Parade – Alan Bray

22697520UntitledThe year is 1806, and Russian cavalry officer Alexi Ruzhensky journeys to Munich to kill the man responsible for murdering his brother in a duel, French officer Louis Valsin. Already thwarted once at the Battle of Austerlitz by Valsin’s lover, Anne-Marie, Alexi has been told by his father not to fail again.

Obsessed by the main character in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s novel Julie, Alexi becomes romantically entangled with a beautiful and passionate young Bavarian woman.

He hides his true identity and befriends Valsin and Anne-Marie, only to find that he has no thirst for blood. As the three grow closer, tensions mount as Alexi and Anne-Marie desperately try to resist their growing attraction.

But as the novel comes to its explosive conclusion, Alexi will learn that revenge cannot be forgotten so easily.

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My Review 2

The Hour of ParadeThe Hour of Parade is a literary treat; set in 1806, after the Napoleonic victory over the Tsar. It starts out as brother’s quest to avenge his younger brother’s honour but blossoms into an essay about love and hate, right and wrong and ultimately forgiveness. The story is characterised by a complex set of relationships and explores life’s uncertainties and grey areas through the four main characters. The outcome reveals nothing is clear cut where human emotions and interactions are involved.

The story echoes the classics that have come before and indeed the author has included translations of Rousseau’s Julie, which dominates the thinking and actions of Alexi the Russian officer who sets out to avenge the family honour. The characters echo the prejudices and expectations of the time period beautifully, it is their completeness that makes this simple story an enthralling read.

The setting is well described and interesting; the historical detail is all there for the reader to absorb. You experience the action and emotion, rather than watch it from afar and this is a satisfying experience.

The final scenes echo the poignancy of the human effects of war. They reinforce the plot’s authenticity and characters’ realism. A must read for fans of complex relationships played out against a vivid historical tableau.

I received a copy of this book from Createspace via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

The Hour of Parade by Alan Bray
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Hour of Parade by Alan  Bray

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