Posted in Book Review

Blog Tour: Shari Low – Because Mummy Said So – Extract and 4*Review

The era of the yummy mummy has finally gone.

To celebrate this, Shari Low has taken a baby wipe to the glossy veneer of the school of perfect parenting and written Because Mummy Said So to show us the truth about motherhood in all of its sleep-deprived, frazzled glory.

This is a book that every experienced, new or soon-to-be parent will relate to – well, hallelujah and praise be those who worship at the temple of Febreze. For over a decade, Shari wrote a hugely popular weekly newspaper column documenting the ups, downs and bio-hazardous laundry baskets of family life.

Because Mummy Said So is a collection of her favourite stories of parenting, featuring superheroes in pull up pants, embarrassing mistakes, disastrous summer holidays, childhood milestones, tear-jerking nativity plays, eight bouts of chickenpox and many, many discussions that were finished with the ultimate parental sticky situation get-out clause…

 Kobo

iBooks

Google play 

Amazon UK 

Extract- Ready, Aim, Fire…

If reincarnation does in fact exist, can I please make a special request to come back as Julia Roberts? The lovely Julia was pictured last week leaving a Pilates class with her six-week-old twins. It was a sweet, precious and intimate snapshot of domestication: just Julia, her husband, her babies, and an army of helpers so large it could have invaded a small country.

Ladies, how many things are wrong with that scenario? Well, for a start, when my babies were six weeks old I couldn’t find my way out of my dressing gown, never mind into a wee Juicy Couture tracky for a jaunt up the leisure centre.

Secondly, the gilded A-lister was partaking in the practice of evil: an exercise class. Doesn’t she know that there’s an unwritten rule among the sisterhood (or should that be motherhood)? For at least two months – or in my case, years – after childbirth, we’re supposed to milk the memory of the physical trauma we’ve inflicted on our bodies by endeavouring at all times to have our feet in an elevated position and our mouths in close proximity to a chocolate snack. It’s the law.

And thirdly – and this is the real killer – Team Julia was carrying everything for her. She didn’t have a bulk-size box of Huggies strapped to her back. There were no bottles of milk dribbling up the arm of her jumper as she attempted to juggle baby, bag and feeding equipment. And she wasn’t within projectile-vomit range of either of her newborns.

That’s not motherhood, it’s a holiday.

While Miss Roberts gets the five-star, deluxe version of motherhood, this week I’ve been subjected to the self-catering, dodgy plumbing and offensive odours version. In the latest episode of my oh-so-glamorous life, I decided it was time for almost-three-year-old Brad to lose the nappies.

For those of you who are just tucking into a wee cup of tea and a bacon roll, I’ll spare you the details. But let’s just say that disinfectant spray became my very best friend. On the first day of Brad’s nappy liberation, I spent the whole time on my hands and knees contemplating puddles. Who knew children that small could store that much water? My second-born son is the toddler equivalent of a Saharan camel.

By lunchtime, I was soaked, exhausted and could feel the thud of my will to live tunnelling to freedom.

Worse, Brad was getting thoroughly sceptical about my promise that ‘Big Boys Pants’ would give him supernatural powers. Hopefully, one of which would be the ability to control his bladder.

Never has my familiar prima-donna war cry, ‘I bet Jackie Collins doesn’t have to put up with this pish!’ had a more literal meaning.

At four o’clock, wet, smelling of Eau de Sewer and covered in stains that I didn’t even want to think about, I speed-dialled the husband for moral support. It didn’t go well.

‘Hi, honey, having a good day?’ he had the absolute temerity to ask.

A GOOD DAY? Aaargh!

Yes, I know the poor man was only being polite but in my pee-soaked brain that somehow became a patronising comment from a smug bloke sitting in a comfy chair, in a civilised office, having conversations with other adults that consisted of words of more than one syllable, all the while partaking of hot and cold running bloody cappuccinos.

How dare he!

I slammed the phone down in disgust. I didn’t say I was rational. I’m a mother of two toddlers – that’s not in the job description.

Next day, over breakfast I was mulling over my dilemmas for the day: whether donning waterproof clothing was an overreaction, whether Dettox was available in gallon-size tubs and how to convince my husband that we didn’t, in fact, require a marriage guidance counsellor. So absorbed was I in my woes that I didn’t notice that Brad had left the table for a far comfier seat – one atop the porcelain throne. Yes, my wee angel had finally mastered the concept of waste management.

Overjoyed, I had an irresistible compulsion to call the One O’Clock News team to announce the thrilling news: Brad was toilet-trained. There’s only one downside – his aim isn’t brilliant. But then, I’ve never met a grown man who doesn’t share that problem, so I’m guessing it’s a gender thing.

There’s obviously a limit to the supernatural powers of Big Boy Pants.

My Thoughts…

Candid snapshots of life with children are popular at the moment, what makes this one different is that it is retrospective. A collection of thoughts that featured in the author’s column at the time ranging from 2004 -2017. Some of the people and events mentioned will bring back memories and add entertainment value to these amusing anecdotes about parenting and being a working mum.

This book is a fun-filled read for all parents, and its innate honesty is part of its charm. Being the perfect mummy, while holding down a full-time job was a mantra in the nineties, and the first decade of the twenty-first century, thankfully this stereotype has been ousted in recent years by a more realistic view of parenting which this book certainly showcases.

It’s worth reading because its funny, realistic, thought-provoking and poignant and given that many of the stories started in the early noughties a true original that has sparked the honest parenting blogs and books that currently are an important part of our culture.

I received a copy of this book from Head of Zeus via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Shari Low has published eighteen books under her own name and pseudonyms Millie Conway and Ronni Cooper. She is also one half of the writing duo, Shari King. She lives near Glasgow with her husband, two teenagers and a labradoodle. 

Website Twitter Facebook

Advertisements
Posted in Book Review

Why Mummy Swears – Gill Sims – 5* Review

Welcome to Mummy’s world…
The Boy Child Peter is connected to his iPad by an umbilical cord, The Girl Child Jane is desperate to make her fortune as an Instagram lifestyle influencer, while Daddy is constantly off on exotic business trips…
Mummy’s marriage is feeling the strain, her kids are running wild, and the house is steadily developing a forest of mould. Only Judgy, the Proud and Noble Terrier, remains loyal as always.
Mummy has also found herself a new challenge, working for a hot new tech start-up. But not only is she worrying if, at forty-two, she could actually get up off a bean bag with dignity, she’s also somehow (accidentally) rebranded herself as a single party girl who works hard, plays hard and doesn’t have to run out when the nanny calls in sick.
Can Mummy keep up the facade while keeping her family afloat? Can she really get away with wearing ‘comfy trousers’ to work? And, more importantly, can she find the time to pour herself a large G+T?
Probably effing not.

Amazon UK

Amazon

 My Thoughts…

Full of satirical humour, this hilarious account of being a mum in the 21st-century is guaranteed to make you laugh and empathise with Mummy Ellen as she recounts her experiences with demanding but lovable kids, a less than appreciative husband and parents who present nearly as many problems as her children.

Its nearly twenty years since my kids were this age but I still remember the picky eaters and the constant sibling squabbling, so this story is timeless. The writing style is easy to read and chatty, but beneath the fun and despair, Ellen feels on a daily basis there are relevant examples of how women are perceived within the family and by society at large.

Whether you are in the midst of bringing up a young family or are experiencing it the second time around like me as a granny, this book will lighten your day and let you know it doesn’t only happen to you.

A pertinent, fun read, that you’ll find hard to put down. I received a copy of this book from Harper Collins – non-fiction via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Book Review

Real Food Kids Will Love – Annabel Karmel – 4* Review

Annabel Karmel brings you a mouth-watering batch of never before seen recipes featuring delicious ingredients with serious nutritional credentials. With beautiful photographs and fresh design, this is an essential book for every modern parent. Chapters range from Fifteen Minute Meals to Healthy ‘Fast Food’, via Holiday Cooking with Kids and Lunchbox Snacks, and fresh, easy and modern dishes include Quinoa Chicken Fingers, Crispy Baked Cod, The Best Buttermilk Pancakes and Carrot Cake Balls. The chapters are designed to make choosing a fuss-free dish simple. Many recipes include swap-outs to cater for those with food allergies, intolerances or particularly fussy eaters! There is a huge range of meat-free and vegan meal options as well as recipes including meat and fish. Real Food Kids Will Love offers everything today’s parents are looking for once their babies are ready to start joining in with family mealtimes. Each dish is designed to be enjoyed by the whole family, while remaining simple, healthy, and not too salty or sugary for young children.

Amazon UK 

Amazon

My Thoughts…

Full of interesting modern recipes that are designed to appeal to children, but will be enjoyed by the entire family. The recipes use everyday, reasonably priced ingredients and the preparation method are easy to follow.

 There’s nothing inherently new in this cookery book, but the information on portions sizes, ways of getting children to eat the food that’s good for them is useful.

Aimed at children of toddler age and above, older children can help make some of the recipes, so they understand what goes into a healthy meal.

Always on the lookout for new recipes and things that my grandson will eat, I’m going to enjoy recreating the recipes in this book.

I received a copy of this book from Pan Macmillan- Bluebird via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Posted in Book Review

Annie Lowrey- 4* Review -Give People Money

 

 

Imagine if every month the government deposited $1,000 into your checking account, with nothing expected in return. It sounds crazy, but it has become one of the most influential and hotly debated policy ideas of our time. Futurists, radicals, libertarians, socialists, union representatives, feminists, conservatives, Bernie supporters, development economists, child-care workers, welfare recipients, and politicians from India to Finland to Canada to Mexico–all are talking about UBI.

Economics writer Annie Lowrey looks at the global UBI movement. She travels to Kenya to see how a UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth out of destitution, India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor, South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree, and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human labor.

Lowrey examines the potential of such a sweeping policy and the challenges the movement faces, among them contradictory aims, uncomfortable costs, and, most powerfully, the entrenched belief that no one should get something for nothing. She shows how this arcane policy offers not only a potential answer for our most intractable economic and social problems but also a better foundation for our society in this age of turbulence and marvels. 

Amazon UK

Amazon

My Thoughts…

An excellent discussion of the principles of Universal Basic Income (UBI), with illuminating case studies from across the world. The majority of the text concentrates on the United States economy, political structure and social systems, but the ideas translate to both developed and underdeveloped countries

Other types of social reform are also discussed. Some ideas, such as universal Child Benefit and access to healthcare both endemic in British society, since the twentieth century, although it has to be said the successive government in recent years have actively worked to dismantle them.

The UBI principle is not new, but perhaps it has never been more relevant with a growing social divide between the rich and the poor, exacerbated by technological developments reducing the needs for routinised jobs. The idea that everyone should receive a basic income regardless of status would bring most out of poverty and improve their quality of life.

This book shows the cost while high is not prohibitive and the improvement in people’s lives, which may ultimately reduce health and social costs, immense. Funding such a scheme is not the only issue, the population’s mindset needs to change, to accept everyone’s right to have a decent life, whether or not they have money, a high earning job and good health.

Women could be the primary benefactors from UBI, often they assume the role of homemaker and carer of elderly relatives. They are penalised for this in financial and social terms. Even though by doing so they allow countries to make a significant financial saving. They also improve the lives of their children and relatives by providing them with a caring, supportive environment. These are roles I have personally undertaken, and while I gained immeasurable emotional benefit from doing this, I have suffered in career terms and financially.

Written in an informative, easy to read style, well-researched with clear, representative arguments, this book is worth reading, whether or not you are interested in economics.

I received a copy of this book from  Penguin Random House – Ebury Publishing -W. H Allen via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

Posted in Memoir, Non-Fiction

Finding Gobi Dion Leonard 5* Review

In 2016, Dion Leonard, a seasoned ultramarathon runner, unexpectedly stumbled across a little stray dog while competing in a gruelling 155-mile race across the Gobi Desert. The lovable pup, who earned the name ‘Gobi’, proved that what she lacked in size, she more than made up for in heart, as she went step for step with Dion over the treacherous Tian Shan Mountains, managing to keep pace with him for nearly 80 miles.

As Dion witnessed the incredible determination of this small animal, he felt something change within himself. In the past, he had always focused on winning and being the best, but his goal now was simply to make sure that his new friend was safe, nourished and hydrated. Although Dion did not finish first, he felt he had won something far greater and promised to bring Gobi back to the UK for good to become a new addition to his family. This was the start of a journey neither of them would ever forget with a roller coaster ride of drama, grief, heartbreak, joy and love that changed their lives forever.

Finding Gobi is the ultimate story of hope, of resilience and of friendship, proving once again, that dogs really are ‘man’s best friend.’

Amazon UK

Amazon

My Thoughts… 

A lovely, honest, heartfelt memoir from an ultramarathon runner. Dion shares how meeting a little dog in China during a gruelling race changed and enriched his life.

This true-life story has a happy ending, so you know from the beginning whatever happens things turn out well for Dion and his doggy friend.

Dion is a driven individual whose childhood ended abruptly with the death of the man he called dad. Much of Dion’s motivation for pushing himself beyond reasonable limits can be traced back to his childhood. The memoir flows like a novel and is full of action, conflict, grounded characters and poignant moments.

Meeting Gobi is serendipitous, and Dion is determined she will be his. The sacrifices he makes, the people he meets and the different culture he learns to live with making this an enthralling read. Gobi’s story is touching, and many times your heart is in your mouth as you wonder if she will ever make it to the UK and life with Dion.

The insight into 21st-Century China is fascinating. The real-life action is heartstopping and the bond between man and dog rewarding. So familiar to everyone who shares their life with a doggy friend.  Whether or not, China, dogs and running are part of your life you will enjoy this well-paced, action-packed, original story, I did.

I received a copy of this book from Harper Collins Non-Fiction via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Book Review, Childrens Books

My First MOG 123 – Judith Kerr – 5* Review

Join everyone’s favourite pet, and learn to count with MOG!

Mog is the forgetful cat that everybody loves, and now you can learn to count with her in this brand new book for very young readers.
This delightful book is the perfect introduction to counting, and with its gorgeous illustrations and Mog’s unique humour, it’s sure to remain a favourite for years to come.

Perfect for very young readers from ages two and up.

Amazon UK

Amazon

My Thoughts…

MOG is a timeless favourite character, I read MOG’s storybooks with my children, and now I’m reading with my grandson.

The illustrations are comical and colourful, and the numbers are clearly defined. Arranged with the number in large, clear font on the left-hand side and the MOG illustration and phrase, including the number on the right-hand side,  it is easy to use and reinforces the number using MOG’s comical antics. There is a summary of all the numbers  1 to 10 at the end, as MOG dreams of counting.

It is suitable for children of one year upwards because they can enjoy the pictures and become familiar with the number shapes. My grandson is two, and he named most of the numbers and counted the items in the MOG illustrations.

I received a copy of this book from HarperCollins Children’s via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

Posted in Book Review, Childrens Books

All Aboard the Toilet Train – Bing 5* Review

Join Bing on a toilet training adventure in this interactive sound book – perfect for encouraging young children to use the toilet with confidence.

Bing doesn’t use his potty anymore – he uses the big toilet, and you can too! It can be scary at first, but with a little practice, you’ll be catching the Toilet Train in no time.

Bingsters will love pressing the sound icon and joining in the fun. Choo! Choo!

Catching the toilet train. . . It’s a Bing thing!

Amazon UK

Amazon

My Thoughts…

A lovely brightly coloured, easy to follow book featuring the toddler’s favourite Bing. I read the digital version which isn’t interactive.
The interactive board book will have even more toddler appeal as they love to press buttons and make noise. A fun, way to tackle toilet training. My two-year-old grandson loved it.
I received a copy of this book from HarperCollins UK Children’s via NetGalley in return for an honest review. 

Posted in Book Review, Memoir

everything I know about love – Dolly Alderton 3*Review

When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown-up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you’ve ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. It’s a book about bad dates, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

Glittering with wit and insight, heart and humour, Dolly Alderton’s powerful début weave together personal stories, satirical observations, a series of lists, recipes, and other vignettes that will strike a chord of recognition with women of every age – while making you laugh until you fall over. Everything I Know About Love is about the struggles of early adulthood in all its grubby, hopeful uncertainty.

Amazon UK

Amazon

 My Thoughts…

‘Everything I Know About Love’, is a memoir written by a woman in her late twenties, while the writing quality is excellent, am I showing my age? (definitely a 20th-century woman). Aren’t memoirs usually written by people in the autumn of their years?

This book encompasses the central themes of the 21st-century: a fascination with all things celebrity and reality. Parties, drugs, sex, friendship are its mainstays, retold in a charmingly entertaining way. What I didn’t like is the casual reference to ‘Class A’ drugs as if they are nothing out of the ordinary, something everyone does. Drugs were a feature of life when I was in my teens and twenties, but they weren’t socially acceptable as they are now. 

The fast pacing holds the reader’s interest, and the life events recounted, read like a novel. If you are looking for a snapshot of life for young women of a particular social class in the 21st-century, this is a great example.

I received a copy of this book from Fig Tree Penguin Books UK via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

 

Posted in Book Review, New Books

4* Review: Germ Warfare of the Corporate Kind – Noel Warnell

75cc8bb3-9785-4c53-b2e5-7a281229676c

Mystery Thriller Blurb

The corporate world is sick. It’s full of disease and suffering. Even the bravest, brightest people are being infected despite having strong immune systems. At times like this, we need help. We need awareness. We need remedies. This book aims to give you the cure.

This hilarious book is the result of years of ‘in the trenches’ research into corporate diseases and by reading it, you’re taking a step towards a happier and healthier place to work, for yourself and for others, as you:

● become aware of the 25 corporate diseases lurking in your office
● discover how to quickly and easily identify symptoms
● receive expert guidance on how to disrupt and destroy them

The ailments you’ll discover are grouped into categories, driven by the part of the body infected – the mind, the eyes, the ears, the mouth, the face, the blood and the hands.

So, with your helmet and your antibacterial hand sanitizer at the ready, prepare for battle…

Mystery Thriller Buy LinksAmazon UK

Amazon

Mystery Thriller My Review
‘Germ Warfare of the Corporate Kind’ is a witty, light-hearted and undoubtedly accurate account of office personalities, how to recognise them and suggested remedies for combating what ails them. Anyone who has worked in an office setting, particularly on a corporate scale will instantly recognise some of the ‘diseases’ described and the more self-aware will recognise their own shortcomings.
Aptly and cleverly named conditions make the book, divided into sections of the body, a quick and easy read. The descriptions are resplendent with imagery and often humorous. In addition, this book contains useful information, for those responsible for a harmonious office environment. It’s a novel way of demonstrating individual and team behaviour with advice on reduction of negative traits to promote positivity in your corporate world.
As a training tool at team-building meetings and events, participants could identify traits they see in themselves and each other in a safe non- threatening setting.
An entertaining book with practical possibilities, worth reading.
I received a copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.

Posted in Book Review, New Books

5* Review The High-Street Bride’s Guide Samantha Birch

Brides-to-be, this one’s for you!

You can say your vows in a catwalk gown so beautiful it reduces your mum to tears (and not because she paid for it).

You can style a reception so stunning your guests won’t believe you didn’t hire an A-list planner.

And you can sprinkle the day with personal touches that make everyone feel like you gave them special attention before they even got there. Without spending a house deposit on it. Honest.

 

 

My Review

 The High Street Bride's GuideI have to admit that when I saw ‘The High-Street Bride’s Guide on NetGalley I thought it was a ‘Rom Com’. On reading the blurb I realised it was a non-fictional guide to achieving the wedding you want without having to take out a second mortgage and I was intrigued.

I got married over thirty years ago before the infinite choices provided by the internet and the modern preoccupation with designer weddings however I have a daughter in her twenties and decided the opportunity to update myself on today’s wedding choices was too good to miss.

The guide is user-friendly, full of anecdotal humour which presents the factual information in easy to read bytes. Broken into key element chapters with links on the contents page it is possible to easily dip in and out of this eBook a must requirement for any guide. Packed with options and cost cutting tips this guide is a great aide memoir for whatever type of special day you want and caters for all budgets.

Brides-to-be can save hours of research and disappointment by following the guide’s advice and finding the right shops and websites immediately. ‘The High-Street Bride’s Guide’ uses professional research and personal experience in every chapter. With regular updates it should be a bestseller.

I received a copy of this book from Harper Collins UK Harper Impulse via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

The High Street Bride’s Guide by Samantha Birch

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


The High Street Bride's Guide

Samantha Birch

Jane Hunt Writer First Steps

Jane Hunt Writer Book Reviews Google+

View all my reviews