Posted in Book Review, Domestic Thriller, Noir, Psychological Thriller, Suspense

The Starter Wife – Nina Laurin – 4*#Review @MulhollandUK @HodderBooks @HodderFiction @NinaLaurinBooks #PsychologicalThriller #Suspense #DomesticThriller

Claire Westcott tries to be the perfect wife to Byron but fears she will never measure up to his ex, Colleen. After all, it’s hard to compete with the dead.

Colleen went missing eight years ago. Her body was never found but the police ruled it a suicide. So when Claire receives a phone call from a woman she believes is Colleen, it sparks a million terrifying questions.

Claire discovers the couple weren’t as happy as they would have people believe. And now she’s worried Byron has been lying to her.

There are secrets in every marriage, but sometimes those secrets are deadly.

Amazon UK

Waterstones

I received a copy of this book from Hodder and Stoughton UK – Mulholland Books UK via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

The illusion of a perfect marriage is a popular trope for psychological thrillers. but this one has enough originality to make it addictive. Told from two points of view, Claire, Byron’s second wife, and an unknown younger woman, it uncovers a web of lies. Claire is an unreliable protagonist, she drinks and is obsessive. She is hard to empathise, even though she appears to be the victim. The other point of view is also obsessive and appears to present a threat to Byron and Claire’s marriage.

The pace and length of the story are perfect, no unnecessary detail, to detract from the character insights and the events, past and present that the plot reveals. This is a complex story, with many twists, the reader deviates between Claire, Byron and the mystery point of view, who is the victim and who is the antagonist?

It’s a story that demands concentration, you can’t dip in and out, the clues are there, and are more obvious as the story heads towards its conclusion, but they are easy to miss, or misconstrue.

The ending fits well with what has gone before and is a satisfactory conclusion of this cleverly plotted, page-turning, psychological thriller.

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Posted in Book Review, Family Drama, Friendship

Her Husband’s Mistake- 5* #Review Sheila O’Flanagan @headlinepg @HeadlineFiction @sheilaoflanagan #Family #Relationships #Life #PublicationDay

Roxy’s marriage has always been rock solid.

After twenty years, and with two carefree kids, she and Dave are still the perfect couple.

Until the day she comes home unexpectedly and finds Dave in bed with their attractive, single neighbour.

Suddenly Roxy isn’t sure about anything – her past, the business she’s taken over from her dad, or what her family’s future might be. She’s spent so long caring about everyone else that she’s forgotten what she actually wants. But something has changed. And Roxy has a decision to make.

Whether it’s with Dave, or without him, it’s time for Roxy to start living for herself…

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Headline via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Living and then married to her school sweetheart, Roxy’s adult life has always been a partnership, she thought their marriage was strong, their family, all they both wanted. When her father became terminally ill, she expected, and received her husband Dave’s support, until she didn’t.

Arriving home unexpectedly after the funeral, she finds her loving husband committing the ultimate betrayal, with their attractive next-door-neighbour, and just like that everything changes for Roxy and her young children.

Even though this a soul-destroying discovery, it is written with self-deprecating humour, Roxy is restrained, her reactions even surprise herself, but she is a reflective thinker and doesn’t make life-changing decisions on impulse. She walks away to the safety of her childhood home, kids in tow, to decide on the future for all of them.

Grief for her father and her marriage rule her emotions, but she has responsibilities and moves forward, even though she wants to hide in a dark room and lick her wounds, like an injured animal. This story charts her journey of self-realisation, as she discovers new challenges and possibilities suddenly visible now she is released from the safety bubble of her marriage.

Dave wants his easy life back, even though he is the one who jeopardised it, It’s hard to feel any empathy for such a self-absorbed creature. Roxy is strong, giving and dependable, she is easy to empathise, many mothers will recognise something of themselves in her behaviour and personality traits, regardless of their circumstances.

Easy to read, with contemporary issues and believable, complex characters, this story of empowerment and family life is relatable, and that is why it’s so engaging to read.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, Romance -Dark and Steamy

Cape May – 4* #Review Chip Cheek @orionbooks @wnbooks @ChipCheek @PoppyStimpson

September 1957

Henry and Effie, young newlyweds from Georgia, arrive in Cape May, New Jersey, for their honeymoon. It’s the end of the season and the town is deserted. 
As they tentatively discover each other, they begin to realize that everyday married life might be disappointingly different from their happily-ever-after fantasy.

Just as they get ready to cut the trip short, a decadent and glamorous set suddenly sweep them up into their drama – Clara, a beautiful socialite who feels her youth slipping away; Max, a wealthy playboy and Clara’s lover; and Alma, Max’s aloof and mysterious half-sister.

The empty beach town becomes their playground, and as they sneak into abandoned summer homes, go sailing, walk naked under the stars, make love, and drink a great deal of gin, Henry and Effie slip from innocence into betrayal, with irrevocable consequences that reverberate through the rest of their lives…

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Orion Publishing – W&N Books via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Told from Henry’s point of view, this story explores his honeymoon with Effie as they discover marriage isn’t quite the fairytale they believed. Disillusioned they are swept away by a glamorous trio of people who they meet in the deserted jet-set resort. What follows changes their lives forever, and explores a way of life that is far removed from the clean, wholesome ideal of 1950s North America.

There are obvious and deliberate similarities between this story and ‘The Great Gatsby’. The glamour, the importance of money, the innocence of the young couple, and the ethos of desperate sadness.

Henry’s innocence and naivety, and the lack of reality he feels in Cape May make him easy prey. Full of sexual innuendo and passion, which highlight the differences between the young couple and their new friends. Most disturbing is the way Clara, Max, Alma, and ultimately Henry and Effie, treat other people’s houses and possessions. They are similarly careless of people’s feelings.

Whilst you may be taken in by their glamour, and their risque way of life, especially against the staid historical background of 1950s America. They also appear shallow, immoral and pathetic as they strive for something decadent to give them their next high.

Even though the characters are not likeable, the story is. I like its authenticity, sensuality and insight. The ending is poignant and full of lost opportunities for happiness. There is an undeniable question of what if they’d honeymooned on Florida?

Posted in Book Review

BlogTour: – Fiona Perrin – The Story After Us – Guest Post – 4* Review

 

If she tries very hard, Ami can remember when she used to have a dynamic and exciting career and a husband who she loved more than life itself, and who was equally smitten with her…

Now she has two children, a terrifyingly large mortgage, and no idea who she has become – or why she and her husband can’t even be in the same room anymore.

With life as she knew it in tatters around her, Ami is heartbroken, and in no way pulling off ‘consciously uncoupling’ like a celeb. But she’s starting to wonder if she just might come out the other side and be….happier?

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iBooks 

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Guest Post – Fiona Perrin

‘The Story After Us…’It’s a story for everyone who found out that happy-ever-after had a sequel and for everyone who’s faced irreconcilable differences and survived.

I wanted to write about messy, modern love. I know lots of women whose families don’t look like they belong in a magazine spread but are filled with happiness, humour and hope. I am divorced myself – a long while ago – and good mates and parents with my ex-husband while happily married to my second. I’m a mother and stepmother to four kids and have had a fairly full-on job while they’ve been growing up. Ami’s story isn’t mine, but I hope it’s one that relatable to lots of women – and makes them laugh.

I’ve always written but, in 2012 I signed up for the Curtis Brown Creative writing course with a very rough draft of a novel. I learned loads about great storytelling during the short course and threw away most of my word count. Then, with the help of a spin-off writing group that met every Monday fortnight for years, I wrote it again.

Eventually, I was lucky enough to get the editorial input of my agent, Diana Beaumont, who helped me write it again a few more times. Then Aria wanted to publish it, and everything got really exciting.

The truth is I’ve always wanted to be a novelist, but there was also the day job, the kids and life, like loads of other writers. And I wanted to learn how to get it right, so it took a while. One thing I would say is if you can find a group of supportive writers, sign up, critique their submissions and get all the feedback you can on yours. My group has gone on to have four published writers and with more to come.

 My next book has a mad, modern family with a difficult dilemma at its heart. It’s different the second time – I have a lot more certainty about what I’m doing. This time, I’m writing the first draft without going back to edit as I go, because I’ve learned the value of multiple drafts honed over and over. But it’s also because the story is tumbling out…

My Life as a Writer…

There’s still the day job (sales and marketing), but I’m working as a freelance now, so that makes everything a lot easier. And the kids are older and lovely (not that they weren’t, but you know…) and I’ve got a study by the sea at the end of the Lizard peninsula in Cornwall where we are restoring a decaying Edwardian house near the lighthouse. We call it life on the edge because it is (of England) and so far, it’s pretty great.

I type overlooking the lighthouse, the sea and lots of sheep. When the weather is bad (and it’s our own freak microclimate), there is a foghorn that goes off, in a low, melancholy wail. I’m quite fond of it. We call them foghorn days and, very occasionally, we make that the equivalent of a pyjama day and just laze around reading and watching rom coms.  I’m a big believer in foghorn days.

My Thoughts…

Ami is a fighter, whatever life throws at her she faces it, solves it, and then the next obstacle rears up. I am exhausted after reading this. Lars may be the love of her life, but he is an annoying character and even when he eventually tries to do the right thing I still don’t like him much.

Angst and realism underscore this poignant and often amusing story, which moves between the past, Lars and Ami’s love story and the present, what happens when it implodes. I enjoyed the real-time story best because whatever happens in their past, it’s not going to end well.

Ami has to be everything to their children when Lars decides he prefers his work life to his home life. Okay, their financial struggle is relative, not everyone has the luxury of an au pair even an appalling one, but everything falls on Ami’s shoulders first, and she has to juggle her children’s well being, her fledgeling company and her failing marriage.

‘The Story After Us’, is a woman’s view of family, love, marriage and work, it’s an authentic 21st-century story where happy-ever-after doesn’t exist but happy families can.

I received a copy of this book from Aria via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Fiona Perrin was a journalist and copywriter before building a career as a sales and marketing director in industry. Having always written, she completed the Curtis Brown Creative Writing course before writing The Story After Us. Fiona grew up in Cornwall, hung out for a long time in London and then Hertfordshire, and now writes as often as possible from her study overlooking the sea at the end of The Lizard peninsula.

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Posted in Book Review

A Year of Taking Chances – 4* Review – Jennifer Bohnet

Life is about to change forever…

When best friends, Tina and Jodie, make a drunken New Year’s Eve vow to change their lives before they hit the big 3 – 0, neither expected to end the year with much more than another hangover…

Twelve months later, Jodie is married and living in Provence – and Tina is exactly where she was a year ago (although now her rent is double). Tina can’t help but feel a little bit left behind, but as Jodie reminds her, she’s not thirty yet, there’s still time to quit her job, start her own literary agency and sign the man of her dreams!

Amazon UK

Amazon

My Thoughts…

Closer to thirty than twenty, two friends make New Years Eve resolutions that they will change their lives for the better by the time they are thirty. For Jodie, the chances come sooner than she imagines and she spends the next New Year on honeymoon. When Jodie moves to the South of France Tina is left behind in London. She wonders if life will change too. 

A Year of Taking Chances follows both women’s lives which diverge and connect as they take the opportunities offered them. Jodie has to adjust to life in a different country with a man she doesn’t know well. Still hurting from tragic loss, she makes new relationships and discovers hurtful secrets as she forges a new life in France. Tina takes a courageous step to change her life, which reconnects her with Jodie and opens up the possibility of the life she wants and maybe someone to share it with but it’s complicated. 

The plot is fast-paced and absorbing; there are lighthearted and touching moments as the women follow their dreams.Sharing the women’s hopes and dreams is a rollercoaster ride but they are both likeable characters, and you want them to succeed. A story of family and friendship and being brave enough to take a chance even when you don’t know the outcome. An easy read, perfect when you want to escape for an hour or two.

I received a copy of this book from HQ Digital via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Posted in Book Review, New Books

4* Review: I Take You – Eliza Kennedy

24891897Poppy - Blurb

I’m getting married.

He’s perfect!

It’s a disaster.

Meet Lily Wilder – New Yorker, lawyer and the luckiest woman in the world. She has a dream job, friends who adore her, a family full of charismatic and loving women, and a total catch of a fiancé.

Also? She has no business getting married.

Lily’s fiancé Will is a brilliant, handsome archaeologist. Lily is sassy, impulsive, fond of a good drink (or five) and completely incapable of being faithful to just one man. Lily likes Will, but does she love him? Will loves Lily, but does he really know her? As the wedding approaches, Lily’s nights – and mornings, and afternoons – of booze, laughter and questionable decisions become a growing reminder that the happiest day of her life might turn out to be her worst mistake yet.

Flowers - Buy Links
Amazon UK
Amazon

Flowers - My Review

 

 

I Take YouThere’s nothing sweet about Lily and yet she makes an instant impression that deepens as her story unfolds and despite her lack of tact, questionable morals and other faults I ended up liking her.

I like to escape to another world, when I read and this book certainly delivers. I’ve never visited New York but the characterisations and ethos appear realistic, as you might expect from someone who lives there.

‘I Take You’, is deliberately controversial. Lily enjoys sex and fails to be monogamous even when she is supposedly in a committed relationship with Will and many readers of RomCom and Chick Lit may find her difficult to empathise with, or even understand. I let the story flow over me, laughed at the ribald humour and read the story in a few hours.

The pacing is fast, except for the last couple of chapters, which slowed down the story and didn’t deliver any surprises. The ending too is a little anticlimactic, although romantic. The characters are vivid, I especially liked Freddy. Will is harder to like, read the story and see if you agree.

I received a copy of this book from Vintage Books Random House via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

 

I Take You by Eliza Kennedy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


I Take You by Eliza Kennedy

Eliza Kennedy

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