Posted in Author Interview, Blog Tour, Book Review, Crime, Noir, Thriller

The Quiet Ones – Theresa Talbot 5*#Review @Aria_Fiction @Theresa_Talbot #Crime #InvestigativeJournalist #OonaghONeil #Thriller#BlogTour #bookreview #author #interview

If only someone had listened…

When the supposed suicide of famous Scottish football coach Harry Nugent hits the headlines, the tabloids are filled with tributes to a charitable pillar of the community that gave so much back to sport and to those less fortunate.

But something isn’t right. Normally celebrities are queuing up to claim to have had a very special relationship with the deceased, but investigative journalist Oonagh O’Neil is getting the distinct impression that people are trying to distance themselves from Harry.

Oonagh’s investigation leads her to uncover a heartbreakingly haunting cover-up that chills her to the core… and places her in mortal danger from those willing to protect their sadistic and dark secrets at any cost…

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#TheQuietOnes #BlogTour

I received a copy of this book from Aria via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

The third in the series of the investigative journalist, Oonagh O’Neil, novels, once again tackles a heinous crime that is currently topical. The grisly death of a high-profile football coach opens a dark and powerful web of lies and secrets that exist in plain sight, yet no one appears to care.

The appeal of this story is its authenticity and topicality. There is no gratuitous description in this story, but the themes are dark and hard to read about. The story follows Oonagh’s investigation into the football coach’s death, and what lies behind it. It leads her into some dark places, with frightened victims, and powerful culprits, who will stop at nothing to save themselves.

Oonagh is a clever and tenacious investigator, who uses her contacts ruthlessly, and her personal experiences to get to the truth. Her flaws and overuse of alcohol, make her relatable, and real, Given what she sees and experiences in the course of her investigations, it isn’t surprising she needs to forget sometimes.

The language and behaviour give the novel’s setting authenticity and the plot is cleverly twisted and layered with menace and suspense. The ending ties up the investigation well and concludes this disturbingly poignant story convincingly.

Author Interview -Theresa Talbot – The Quiet Ones

Interview Questions – Theresa Talbot

What are the inspirations behind your Oonagh O’Neil series, and this story in particular?

All three of my Oonagh O’Neil books have been inspired by real-life events. As a journalist, I’m particularly interested in those crimes committed in plain sight – institutionalised crimes and injustices where often no-one will ever be convicted. The Lost Children was the first in the series and came about after research I was doing on the Magdalene Intuition – for those readers unfamiliar with the Magdalenes, there’s a wealth of information online. But they effectively were asylums to house so-called ‘fallen women’. I’d discovered there had been one in Glasgow and once I started digging, I was hooked and formed a crime novel around the circumstances surrounding its closure. Keeping Her Silent was inspired by the tainted blood scandal – again a google search will lead you down a wormhole which will shock you. I interviewed one of the victims and the story was the perfect backdrop for a crime novel. This latest, The Quiet Ones, came about after a chance meeting with a Glasgow Taxi driver who had been instrumental in the conviction of a football coach who had been abusing boys in his care. There’s nothing graphic in the novel – we all know how horrific such cases are – rather the story focuses on how a public figure can evade justice for so long. We only have to look at the likes of Jimmy Saville & Jeffrey Epstein to know that this is sadly a reality. 

How did you create your Oonagh O’ Neil, investigative journalist character? Is she based on someone you know, an imaginative creation, or a little of both?

I’ve grown so fond of Oonagh. Given my background (I’m a freelance journalist with BBC Scotland) it was easy for me to create the character. She’s not based on me, but some people recognise certain traits and characteristics. I wanted to make her a real, flesh and blood character. She’s flawed, she gets things wrong, she’s a bit of a mess at times – but she has integrity and always fights for the underdog. Professionally she’s top of her game – personally, she’s a train-wreck. Too often we shy away from flawed female characters – but they exist in real life, and should exist on the page too. I named her after Charlie Chaplin’s last wife – the love of his life. He’s a hero of mine, so I stole her name and changed the spelling. 

How do you make your characters believable?

I teach creative writing workshops and this is my favourite topic. Characters have to be allowed to have flaws and make mistakes. Also, they need to be on a journey, developing as the storyline progresses. How they deal with conflict is crucial – what’s their motivation? What’s the story BEHIND their motivation? And finally, give them a voice. Each character has to have a unique way of speaking. Read the dialogue aloud. Does it drive the story forward, does it fit with the character’s motivation? All of this will help shape your characters. I know some of the advice suggests know everything about your character – birthday, favourite colour, child-hood pet etc… I make it up as I go along.. but I know what drives Oonagh. I know what makes her tick. I know why she doesn’t suffer fools gladly, I know why she drinks too much and pushes the self-destruct button now and again. She has dark hair – I put that in the first novel, but other than that it doesn’t really matter what she looks like. The reader can decide that – that’s a personal thing between the reader and the character – it’s really none of my business.  

When you write, what comes first, the characters, the plot or the setting? Why do you think this is?

For my first book, the character and the plot became intertwined very quickly. Initially, I suppose it was the seed of an idea surrounding a riot that closed the Magdalene asylum in Glasgow – then I had a female journalist investigate the story behind it. But the end story is nothing like what I imagined it to be. Now it’s the character – Once I had Oonagh as a fully formed character I had to find stories for her to investigate.

What made you decide to become a writer, and why does this genre appeal to you?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since my late teens. I came from a family of storytellers, and I love listening to stories and reading of course. As a journalist, I’ve written every day of my professional life for the past 25 years so moving into fiction was the best stage for me. Crime genre was I suppose the obvious one – most journalists turn to crime eventually!

What sort of books do you enjoy reading and why?

I love crime books, especially Scottish crime fiction – but they have to have well-developed characters and gripping storylines and be devoid of sexualised violence. I know sexual violence exists, but I abhor when violence is sexualised.   I also love black humour, slice of life and uplit. Anne Tyler is an old favourite that I need to revisit. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier is simply wonderful, and anything by George Orwell. I recently read Anne Griffin ‘When All Is Said.’ It’s her debut novel and beautifully written. I think my taste can be described as eclectic.  

 What are you currently writing?

I’m mortified to say I started three new books in one month – despite advice from other author friends not to!  I still embarked on this utter madness until I realised I had to narrow it down. The other 2 have been put on ice for now, and I’m working on a standalone about a woman who was involved in a terrible accident and suffers from the most horrific survivor’s guilt. By the time you read this, I may have ditched that idea and resurrected the other 2 from the drawer!

Theresa Talbot is a freelance writer, journalist and radio presenter, perhaps best known as the voice of Traffic and Travel on BBC Radio Scotland and as the host of The Beechgrove Potting Shed. Prior to working with the BBC, she was with Radio Clyde and the AA Roadwatch team. Theresa worked in various roles before entering the media as an assistant in children’s homes, a Pepsi Challenge girl and a library assistant. She ended up at the BBC because of an eavesdropped conversation on a no.66 bus in Glasgow. Her passions include rescuing chickens, gardening, music and yoga. Twitter Facebook

Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Friendship, Mystery, Romance, Romantic Suspense, Suspense

A Paris Fairy Tale Marie Laval 5* #Review @ChocLituk @MarieLaval1 @rararesources #Romance #ModernFairytale #Paris #RomanticSuspense #Mystery #ArtHistorian #InvestigativeJournalist #BlogTour #BookReview #bookbloggers #Giveaway

#AParisFairyTale

Is Paris the city of happily ever afters?

Workaholic art historian Aurora Black doesn’t have time for fairy tales or Prince Charmings, even in the most romantic city in the world. She has recently been hired by a Parisian auction house for a job that could make or break her career. Unfortunately, daredevil journalist Cédric Castel seems intent on disrupting Aurora’s routine. 

As Aurora and Cédric embark on a journey across France, they get more than they bargained for as they find themselves battling rogue antique dealers and personal demons, not to mention a growing attraction to each other.

But with the help of a fairy godmother or two, could they both find their happily ever afters? 


AmazonUK

Amazon

#AParisFairyTaleBlogTour

I received a copy of this book from Choc Lit in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Original, magical and mysterious. This romantic suspense set in contemporary Paris has a complex, fast-paced plot, believably flawed characters, a mystery to solve, and an engaging romance between two unlikely lovers.

Aurora recovers from a childhood tragedy, with emotional and physical scars. Instead of being treasured by her grandparents, they provide material necessities but not emotional succour. Only her innate courage and intelligence saves her from obscurity. She studies hard, and now with a doctorate, is an authority on ancient manuscripts and an Art Historian. Lost in her famous grandfather’s shadow, she receives a prestigious commission. Determined to show she is worthy of the role. Even in this, it appears Aurora is being manipulated.

Investigative journalist Cédric’s barren childhood has left its scars, but a good education, streetwise intelligence, and the love and guidance of an elderly couple foil his criminal inclinations. Now he works for those who cannot protect themselves, his latest investigation draws Aurora’s boss into his sights, but is she involved or an innocent?

The chemistry between the two protagonists is realistic and the verbal sparring amusing. As the mystery deepens and the ethos of menace increases, they are drawn together, unlikely allies, full of mistrust and unwanted sexual attraction. The dynamic between Aurora and Cédric is the basis of a fairy tale style romance played out in the streets of Paris and France.

The plot is complex with good twists, and underscored with danger. It is full of vivid images, which hold the readers’ interest. The cast of characters are well-drawn and complement the plot and protagonists beautifully.

The ending is believable and magical, as every fairy tale should be.

Giveaway to Win an ‘I love Paris’ Keyring, and a medieval necklace (handmade from a copy of an illuminated manuscript) –  UK Only

Click on Giveaway Link to enter

*Terms and Conditions –UK entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will be passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for the fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

#MarieLaval

Originally from Lyon in France, Marie now lives in Lancashire with her family. She works full-time as a modern languages teacher and in her spare time, she loves writing romance and dreaming about romantic heroes. She writes both historical and contemporary romance. Her historical romance The Lion’s Embrace won the Gold Medal at the Global Ebook Awards 2015 (category Historical Romance), and best-selling Little Pink Taxi was her debut romantic comedy novel with Choc Lit. She is a member of the Romantic Novelists Association and the Society of Authors. Her native France, as well as her passion for history and research, very much influences her writing, and all her novels have what she likes to call ‘a French twist’!

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Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Domestic Thriller, Family Drama, Mystery, Romance, Suspense

The Dead Wife – Sue Fortin 5* #Review @HarperCollinsUK @HarperFiction @fictionpubteam @suefortin1 #Suspense #FamilyDrama #InvestigativeJournalist #DomesticThriller #PublicationDay @rararesources

SINCLAIR WIFE DEAD!  HUSBAND CLEARED! 

Police have ruled out suspicious circumstances in the investigation into the death of Elizabeth Sinclair, wife of charismatic entrepreneur Harry Sinclair, found drowned in the lake of the family’s holiday park.

It’s been two years since the Sinclair case closed but when reporter Steph Durham receives a tipoff that could give her the scoop of the year, she’s drawn deeper and deeper into the secretive Sinclair family.

Elizabeth’s death wasn’t a tragic accident. And the truth will come at a deadly price…

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I received a copy of this book from Harper Collins UK – Harper Fiction in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

You are thrown into the deep end from the beginning of this book, as you witness a personal tragedy. These scenes engender your empathy towards the victim. Is she as innocent as she seems?

Steph is the PR and journalist for a travel company based in the South of England. She has always wanted to be an investigative journalist, since her days of cub reporting in the North West, but things didn’t work out. The opportunity to review a new leisure venture in her home town is viewed with mixed emotions, but she needs the money. Her friend suggests she uses social media, to advertise her latest job, with a view to gaining further work. The interest she attracts is unexpected and leads her into a role she has always wanted, but at what cost?

The Lake District setting is always good for fiction. The beauty and danger of the landscape, the perfect foil for accidents, or even murder. The Sinclair family, practically own the town, and you are immediately wondering if their influence could cover up a murder? Steph’s estranged mother ran the initial police investigation and her deceased father worked for the Sinclairs, something that puts her at risk, even before she starts her investigation.

The suspense increases with every chapter, and the dual timeline, of Steph’s present-day investigation of Elizabeth’s death, and the historic revelations of Elizabeth’s life up to her demise, work well.

Only Steph and widower Harry are characters that you can empathise, even Elizabeth has her own agenda, and is not really likeable. The other two brothers Dominic and Owen are not attractive humans. One the dominant bully, the other weak, but manipulative. The clues are well hidden in the plot, disguised by the misinformation, but they are there. The ending is well-written, as the suspense reaches breaking-point.

This story keeps you on tenterhooks throughout, with authentic characters, a twisty plot and an unexpected end, it is an excellent domestic thriller.

Sue Fortin is an award-winning USA Today and an Amazon best-selling author, an international bestseller and has reached #1 in the Amazon UK Kindle chart. Sue writes mystery, suspense and romance, sometimes combining all three. 

Sue was born in Hertfordshire but had a nomadic childhood, moving often with her family, before eventually settling in West Sussex where she now lives with her husband, children and grandchildren. Facebook Page Twitter Instagram Website

Posted in Book Review, International Thriller, Political Thriller

To The Lions- Holly Watt – 3*#Review @BloomsburyRaven @Holly_Watt

A journalist must follow the clues, no matter how far that takes her.

Casey Benedict, star reporter at the Post, has infiltrated the lives and exposed the lies of countless politicians and power players. Using her network of contacts, Casey is always on the search for the next big story, no matter how much danger this might place her in, no matter what cost emotionally. 

Tipped off by an overheard conversation at an exclusive London nightclub, she begins to investigate the apparent suicide of a wealthy young British man, whose death has left his fiancée and family devastated. 

Casey’s hunt for the truth will take her from the glitz of St Tropez to the deserts of Libya and on to the very darkest corners of the human mind

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I received a copy of this book from Bloomsbury Publishing -Raven Books via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A young investigative journalist follows a lead that suggests some unscrupulous rich people are hunting the forgotten humans – refugees, for kicks. The trail leads Casey and her fellow journalist Miranda to North Africa, to discover the truth.

This is a high octane, political thriller full of action and violence. The investigative journalist aspect of the story is realistic. The events Casey uncovers are disturbing.

The writing style is factual. The first part of the book is hard to read, but the second half is more dynamic and faster paced.

This story authentically explores the human cost of this tragedy and poses the journalist with believable moral dilemmas.

Posted in Book Review

Blog Tour: Keep Her Silent- Theresa Talbot – Guest Post -5* Review

 ‘Do that which is good and no evil shall touch you’

That was the note the so-called Raphael killer left on each of his victims. Everyone in Glasgow – investigative journalist Oonagh O’Neil included – remember the murder of three women in Glasgow which sent a wave of terror through the city. They also remember that he is still at large…

When the police investigation into the Raphael killings reopens, Oonagh is given a tip-off that leads her straight to the heart of a complex and deadly cover-up. When history starts to repeat itself, it seems the killer is closer than she thinks. Could Oonagh be the next target…?

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Guest Post- Theresa Talbot Keep Her Silence Blog

Hi, thanks so much for asking me along. I’m Theresa Talbot and Keep Her Silent is the second in the Oonagh O’Neil series. This book has been such a labour of love for me. There are three strands running through the narrative; The unsolved Raphael Killings from the 70s, a woman incarcerated in a secure unit for killing her husband and son, and the tainted blood scandal, where thousands of patients across the world were infected with Hep C & HIV through contaminated blood products. The tainted blood scandal is a real-life horror story. Described by Sir Robert Winston as the ‘worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS’ it has wrecked lives, ripped families apart and destroyed victims hopes & dreams for the future.

Although Keep Her Silent is a work of fiction, this part of the story is based on real characters and real-life events. I’ve worked closely with one of the victims and sadly his story is one of nightmares. I’m a journalist, and although, yes I was aware of the scandal, I had no idea of the impact it had and continues to have on the victims.

I decided on a real-life crime as the main backdrop to my story and in particular this one for several reasons. I’ve always been completely fascinated by institutionalised crime; the way that criminal activity is carried out under the full glare of the public, with very few, if any, perpetrators ever facing justice. We only need to glance back a few years to Jimmy Saville, Paedophile rings within religious orders, and corrupt MPs who never face trial.

For me it’s more than a scandal, more than a tragedy  – it’s the biggest crime of the 20th century and beyond. For those unfamiliar with the background: In the 70s & 80s, thousands of haemophiliacs and blood transfusion patients were given contaminated blood products, and subsequently went on to develop Hepatitis and HIV. It was soon discovered that pharmaceutical companies making the products were using ‘skid-row donors’ – paying prisoners, drugs addict & sex workers for each donation, with no rigorous checks on where the blood came from. Thousands of people – including children – have died as a result and many more left disabled, yet despite this not one person has faced criminal prosecution in this country. Pharmaceutical giants made millions from this, they put profit before the suffering of mankind, and were given the full protection of the law. Threading this theme through a crime novel seemed natural to me – readers invest in characters, they sit up and take notice of the human tragedy, they laugh and cry and understand how lives are affected – so much more than if they read about it in a newspaper, or see a news item about it.

That said, I’ve never felt so nervous about writing as I was with this book. I worked very closely with one of the victims and was so desperate to get it right and do him justice. He’d been so open and honest, telling his story. He’s lived with this every day for over forty years. I was acutely aware that Keep Her Silent is a work of fiction, and will mainly be read for entertainment – I needed to ensure that it packed a punch. My research took me down so many paths, I was almost overwhelmed at one stage. There was so much suffering and human tragedy and was still happening in plain sight yet no-one seemed to care.

Despite the dark subject matter, the book is injected with humour. Like life, we often use humour to shed light on tragic situations; otherwise, it would become too heavy..

My main character Ooagh O’Neil is a journalist. She’s flawed and troubled and sometimes gets it wrong – but readers tell me they can identify with her. On the surface, she seems to have a charmed life, but underneath chaos ensues. When she discovers the full horrors of the tainted blood scandal she’s like a dog with a bone and won’t let go. Obviously, there could be no ‘happy ever after’ to this book. This is a real-life tragedy that’s still waiting for justice. Instead, I used my own dramatic licence to give some much-needed resolution to this. I felt such a huge responsibility to everyone affected to get it right. Thankfully, so far, it’s had a very positive response

My Thoughts…

Another episode of dangerous investigative journalism with Oonagh O’Neil that unfolds with the unpredictability of real life and grips the reader with its intensity and menace.

If you haven’t met Oonagh previously you’ve missed out, but this story reads well as a standalone, with enough backstory to illuminate Oonagh as a character and provide the pertinent details on her relationships, motivations and demons.

There are both historic and present timelines and several plot threads that are intricately woven to reveal a polished ending. The writing style draws you in until enthralled you have to know what happens next. The themes are shocking, more so because they highlight real-life conspiracy.

A unique combination of crime, conspiracy and killing seen through the eyes of a quirky, on the edge investigative journalist and a cynical, but thorough policeman makes this a memorable story and a series that I can’t wait to continue.

I received a copy of this book from Aria via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Theresa Talbot is a BBC broadcaster and freelance producer. A former radio news editor, she also hosted The Beechgrove Potting Shed on BBC Radio Scotland, but for many, she will be most familiar as the voice of the station’s Traffic & Travel.

Late 2014 saw the publication of her first book, This Is What I Look Like, a humorous memoir covering everything from working with Andy Williams to rescuing chickens and discovering nuns hidden in gardens. She’s much in demand at book festivals, both as an author and as a chairperson. Twitter Facebook

Posted in Book Review

Hot Pursuit – 3* Review – Rebecca Freeborn

Sarah is a former beauty therapist who doesn’t wear make-up. She’s a wannabe journo for gossip magazine Women’s Choice, but she knows nothing about celebrities. And now the love of her life has run out on her leaving her with a mortgage to handle on her own.

 Her life hasn’t gone the way she expected, and Sarah feels her future slipping from her control, as life decisions come at her from all corners.

Heartbroken and fed up, she decides to take her career by the reins after standing still for far too long.

Sarah lands herself the assignment of a lifetime in Europe, with the gorgeous but egocentric photographer, Nick, who just happens to be her ex’s best friend.

But when Sarah’s assignment takes a darker turn, she discovers there’s more to this story than meets the eye. Is she ready to risk everything to get the scoop?

With a missing rock star, a suspected murderer on the run, and a race against the clock, Hot Pursuit will whisk you away to some of the world’s most romantic destinations.

Amazon UK

Amazon

My Thoughts…

A fun, escapist read, perfect for the beach.

Sarah is a frustrated journalist who is looking for her big break. Her love life is in tatters when she meets a man who may change the course of her life. A lighthearted read, but the subjects it touches are not. Sarah embarks on a trek across Europe following her story; she is naive as an investigative journalist, which produces some hilarious moments and quickly puts her in dangerous situations. Her partner in crime is Nick, the photographer, they have history, and she still has feelings for him, but they are confused, and this leads to snarky banter and sexual tension.

Sarah is a strong protagonist, and her tenacity makes sure she gets her story in the end, despite her inexperience and the numerous false leads she uncovers. Her relationship with Nick provides the story with its romance.

I received a copy of this story from Pantera Press via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Posted in Book Review

Blog Tour: Theresa Talbot – The Lost Children – 5*Review

TV journalist and media darling Oonagh O’Neil can sense a sinister coverup from the moment an elderly priest dies on the altar of his Glasgow church. Especially as his death comes as she is about to expose the shocking truth behind the closure of a Magdalene Institution. The Church has already tried to suppress what happened to decades of forgotten women. Is someone also covering their tracks?

DI Alec Davies is appointed to investigate the priest’s death. He and Oonagh go way back. But what secrets lie behind the derelict Institution’s doors? What sparked the infamous three-day riot that closed it? And what happened to the girls that survived the institution and vowed to stay friends forever?

From Ireland to Scotland.

From life to death.

 Links to buy

 Amazon: https://amzn.to/2pFMSUo

Kobo: https://bit.ly/2GzG9oE

Google Play: http://bit.ly/2IUYsmE

iBooks: https://apple.co/2ulECxt

My Thoughts…

A high profile investigative journalist, the death of a priest and past secrets of abuse and injustice make this mystery thriller an enthralling read.
‘The Lost Children’ is written in dual timelines, the terrible lives of the young girls in the Magdalene Institution in the late 1950s in Galway and Glasgow inform the investigation and mystery explored by Oonagh O’Neil and DI Alec Davies in 2000 Glasgow.

The chapters from the 1950’s are harrowing reading, the abuse suffered by young girls forced into the Magdalene institutions is compounded by their imprisonment and torture when they are there. These young unmarried pregnant girls treated like criminals for being victims of abuse and an uncaring, judgemental society. Their stories are written sensitively and backed up with social history that makes them believable characters.

Oonagh, a successful journalist produces a series of exposes into the seedier areas of Glasgow and British society. Her ongoing investigation into the Magdalene institutions coincides with the death of an old priest who is part of her inquiry, what follows is the gradual revelation of the mysteries and a collision of characters seemingly unconnected as the story progresses.

Oonagh is a dedicated journalist, still grieving for her father, she doesn’t suffer fools, but she is loyal and trustworthy. Her polished outer shell hides a tender heart which she keeps well hidden. Her personal life is complicated, and she has a surprisingly deep friendship with DI Alec Davies a hardened Glasgow cop.

In the year 2000 chapters there are multiple storylines; a frustrated priest, a seedy journalist, cynical police and a successful doctor all have their own stories, but these are necessary to the plot and part of its perfectly pitched ending.

Realistic characters, a well-researched plot tempered with mystery and surprises make this a riveting, crime based thriller.

I received a copy of this book from Aria via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

Theresa Talbot is a BBC broadcaster and freelance producer. A former radio news editor, she also hosted The Beechgrove Potting Shed on BBC Radio Scotland, but for many, she will be most familiar as the voice of the station’s Traffic & Travel. Late 2014 saw the publication of her first book, This Is What I Look Like, a humorous memoir covering everything from working with Andy Williams to rescuing chickens and discovering nuns hidden in gardens. She’s much in demand at book festivals, both as an author and as a chairperson.

Website: http://theresatalbot.com.websitebuilder.prositehosting.co.uk/

Twitter: @Theresa_Talbot

Facebook: Theresa Talbot