Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

A Good Match For The Major Josie Bonham 4*#Review @BonhamJosie @rararesources #RegencyRomance #HistoricaRomance #AGoodMatchForTheMajor #BlogTour #BookReview #TuesdayMotivation

Pride meets prejudice – can love blossom?

Beautiful young widow, Lady Eliza Wyndham, is determined never to remarry after a disastrous first marriage. The undeniable attraction that fizzes between her and Major Nathaniel Overton terrifies her. She rejects his advances.

With his pride badly dented, Nat vows to forget Eliza until he finds her in danger from an old adversary of his army days. His protective instincts are stirred and he steps back into her life, but will Eliza be prepared to accept his help?

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

An engaging Regency romance with a mismatched couple who collide in actuality, and find despite their differences a slow and worthwhile attraction. Eliza, grieving for the loss of her mother and damaged by her late husband vows never to marry again. Nat, a career soldier, shies away from Regency society after a mishap in his youth.

Past scandal, a passionate attraction and a dangerous man all contribute to make this an enjoyable read. I’m looking forward to reading more from this author.

Josie lives in the English midlands, surrounded by towns full of history such as Evesham, Stratford-Upon- Avon, Warwick and Worcester. Which is perhaps why her favourite reads are historical. Out of all the periods to choose from the Regency Era stirs her imagination the most. The true Regency lasted from 1811 until 1820 but dates as wide as 1789 to 1837 have been included in the extended Regency period. For Josie the true flavour of this period emerges after the iniquitous hair powder tax of 1795, unsurprisingly, scuppered the fashion for hair powder almost overnight.

Josie has always dabbled in stories but it took the combined efforts of her sister and eldest niece to set her on the path to writing novels. Her Regency romances, with a dash of adventure and intrigue, are the result.

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Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Excerpt, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

Rosemary or Too Clever to Love G.L. Robinson 4*#Review @gl_robinson @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours #RegencyRomance #BlogTour #BookReview #HistoricalRomance #Rosemary

The Ugly Duckling meets the Gothic novel: a plain governess, a romantic Miss, a stern but handsome guardian, involved in a midnight chase, a woman dressed in britches and a gloomy castle. Throw in a bit of Vivaldi and some French philosophy, and you have it all!

If Rosemary can’t control her wayward pupil and prove her worth to her guardian the Earl, her future is bleak.

When Marianne’s father dies, she and her governess Rosemary are forced to go and live with her guardian the Earl of Tyndell. The Earl has strict ideas about how young ladies should behave. He isn’t impressed by the romantic notions Marianne has absorbed straight from the pages of a Gothic novel. And her governess is not only dowdy but perfectly ready to put him in his place, especially regarding his ideas about the education of women. But when the Earl’s interest in Rosemary blossoms just as Marianne falls in love with the last person he would ever agree to her marrying, where will it all end?

Read Rosemary or Too Clever to Love to see how this tangle is sorted out.

In spite of its light-hearted and often humorous tone, this charming novel raises questions about women’s education and philosophy. Book Group discussion topic have been included at the end.

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

This is a traditional styled Regency Romance featuring Rosemary. Rosemary comes from a genteel, impoverished background and is forced into service to survive. Marianne her charge becomes the ward of the mysterious Earl of Tyndell, on her father’s death and the two women face an uncertain future.

The novel explores the role of women in Regency society and their lack of power. Rosemary is well-educated, and this makes her unusual in Regency society. The chemistry between Rosemary and Giles the Earl is slow-burning but allows the emotional connection to keep pace with the physical attraction. This is a gentle romance with witty dialogue and unrequited feelings that are enjoyable.

Character-driven this story concentrates on the present with only necessary information on the characters’ backgrounds. The story is engaging and romantic.

Excerpt from Rosemary Too Clever to Love

G.L Robinson

Rosemary and Marianne put on a play Rosemary has written about Mary Queen of Scots in a ruined chapel in the grounds.

On the day of the performance, the footmen had carried all the chairs from the ballroom downhill to the ruins, the maids had swept the chancel of bird droppings and leaves and the cook had finally filled her baking pans when, about midday, they received the devastating news that the two young men would be unable to perform. They had that morning been indulging in their favorite pastime of running along the top of the walls that flanked the Hardcastle estate, when they had been surprised by a pheasant shooting from its covert and had fallen headlong into a large bed of tall stinging nettles. Their hands and faces, and more particularly their eyelids, had been quite viciously stung, and all the application of mashed dock leaves in the world had not reduced the swelling. The doctor had been called and had advised their remaining quietly in their beds with the blinds down and cold compresses on their eyes. He had given them a small dose of laudanum and they were presently sleeping. There was no possibility of their performing that day.

It was impossible to change the arrangements. People would be arriving in under three hours. With Marianne wailing and her head in a spin, Rosemary made a rapid decision. Luckily, she had kept both young men’s costumes at High House, not trusting them to remember them. She sent a note to Mrs. Hardcastle, asking her to send over a shirt and britches, possibly something Jasper had grown out of. She would play the parts herself. When she told Marianne what she had decided, that young lady was torn between gratitude and being scandalized.

“You’re going to appear in public in britches?” she gasped. “But, but… how will you change?” She looked horrified.

“Don’t refine upon it dear,” replied Rosemary with more calm than she felt. It will just be for a moment. I just have to wear the britches for Bothwell. He’s the only one seen in normal men’s clothing. And as for changing, I won’t have to, really. I shall go down to the ruins in the britches under my Darnley shroud, with my cloak over all. I shall go behind one of the pillars and take off my cloak. I can play Darnley, then I have only to remove the shroud to play Bothwell. That’s the only time I’ll be seen in britches. Afterwards I’ll don the apron for the Executioner. It will work, I assure you. The good news is that his lordship told me yesterday he will not be able to see the play, as he has urgent business with one of his tenants. Something to do with flooding after all this rain. I was a little disappointed, but now I’m delighted. Say nothing to him, for heaven’s sake!”

Marianne was sufficiently reassured to be able to face his lordship later without a tremor, and when he offered his apologies for missing the performance, said with tolerable equanimity, “Oh, it’s only a silly amusement for children, after all! You may be happy to be missing it.”

The time for the performance arrived. The performers hid behind the chapel pillars and the audience took their seats. The servants from High House stood behind the chairs. They had been agog at all the preparations and what they had seen of the rehearsals. They had obtained the housekeeper’s permission to leave their posts to watch the play, provided they hurried back to serve the guests at tea.

Rosemary rang a bell she had borrowed for the purpose. When the audience quieted, Marianne came forward and announced the title of the piece, then arranged herself on a low draped table serving as her bed. Her head up, as she had been instructed, Mariah walked across as the silent chorus with her notice, and they were off. Rosemary had powdered her hair and face. She dropped her cloak behind a pillar and stepped forward in her shroud. There was a little stir, as it became clear who was playing the part, but it soon quieted as she spoke out in a low, carrying voice. With a dignified gesture, she accused Mary of murdering her.

The Smythe boy came next and did well, hesitating a little at first, but then speaking out boldly and clearly. During that time, Rosemary quickly stripped off the sheet. As she bent to step out of it and to shake the powder from her hair, she was observed from behind by the Earl, who had completed his business more quickly than expected and had returned with more enthusiasm than he would have imagined to see the entertainment. He strode swiftly down the hill, quite by chance approaching at an angle that allowed him to see behind the pillar where Rosemary was effecting her change. He did not at first realize what he was seeing, but then recognized her and stopped abruptly to admire her shapely derriere as she bent in the rather tight britches, for Mrs. Hardcastle had sent over a pair that Jasper had long outgrown. Luckily, Rosemary did not see him, or she would have hesitated before slipping into the embroidered doublet and jamming the feathered hat upon her head. As it was, she came onto the stage and carried off the part of Bothwell with enormous verve, her tone insinuating and insulting, a complete contrast to Darnley. The audience, by now into the story, certainly recognized her, but they were too entranced by the performance to wonder at it.

It was only as she was leaving the stage that her eye fell upon the Earl and her heart gave a leap. Whether she was glad to see him, or embarrassed that he saw her, she could not afterwards tell, and anyway, she was too busy changing herself into the Executioner to think about it. Queen Elizabeth and her lady made their entrance. After all their histrionics during rehearsals, the twins were inclined to look down and fail to project, until Rosemary hissed at them to look at the audience and for the queen to speak up. Mariah crossed the scene for the third Act, and the trial and execution scenes began.

Without telling the other performers, Rosemary had arranged that there would be a pan of red paint behind the black draped stool that served as the execution block. When the axe, a realistic looking instrument with a blade made of heavy card fitted onto a broomstick, came down to cut the head three times, this, by historical account, being the number of strokes required to sever Mary’s head, it came up with red along its blade. There was a collective gasp, both from the audience and the other actors. Then, before raising the severed head, a gory affair made of papier mâché, she dipped it in the pan too, so that when she held it aloft, it dripped in a lifelike grisly fashion. One or two of the housemaids screamed and the audience murmured in delicious horror.

The performance was greeted with enormous acclaim. The Smythes were delighted with their lad’s performance and, ignoring or forgetting the hours Rosemary had spent with him to get him to stand up straight and enunciate clearly, seemed to think it was all his own doing. Mrs. Pendleton was pleased with her daughters in spite of their lackluster performance, while Mr. Pendleton was pleased with the sight of Rosemary in britches. Like the Earl, he had not failed to notice her bottom. He sought her out, but she, quickly donning her cloak and running up the hill, managed to avoid everyone. She went straight to her bedchamber, quickly brushed the rest of the powder out of her hair and changed into a gown. By the time she came down again, the guests had gathered in the drawing room and the tea was being brought in.

“Ah, Miss Drover,” remarked the Earl, seeing her. “I hope you will act as hostess and pour the tea?” he made no mention of the britches.

Rosemary was both astonished and flattered. She had planned to ask Mrs. Hardcastle to act as hostess. She knew that by asking her, his lordship had elevated her status in the household. She inclined her head and went immediately to the silver pots of tea and hot water. She was glad to do it, less for the distinction it gave her, than because it prevented her having to deal with all the questions and comments that her performance would inevitably bring. She had already noticed Mr. Pendleton eying her with light in his eye she did not like. She heard the word britches whispered around the room, usually with sidelong glances at her, but Mrs. Hardcastle wasted no time in describing the accident that had befallen the two male actors, loudly commending Miss Drover for not allowing it to prevent the play from going forward.

Rosemary kept her eyes on the teapots and the maids distributing the cups, until the novelty of her performance appeared to wear off. By the time she was forced to join the guests, as usual on these occasions, the women were sitting in groups chatting about domestic issues, while the gentlemen stood together, talking of horses, farming or world affairs. However, she was not to escape so easily.

“Here is our heroine!” announced Mrs. Hardcastle, and there was a round of applause.

“Jolly well done!” pronounced the General. “I must say, I didn’t realize it was you under that sheet until later when you appeared in those britches. They never looked better, I dare say!”

The General obviously thought his social standing was so impeachable that he could say what he liked. There was a slightly embarrassed murmur from most of the gentlemen, though Mr. Pendleton was heard to mutter “here, here,” and the ladies had the grace at look at the floor, all except Mrs. Mannering, who looked at Rosemary with patent dislike.

“It’s lucky Rosemary knew all the lines, because she wrote the play,” cried Marianne, instinctively recognizing that her companion somehow needed protection, “and she worked out so quickly how she could play all the missing parts. I think she’s amazing!”

“And I think my fellow actors deserve most of the credit for continuing as if nothing were amiss” said Rosemary, smiling at Marianne and glad to be able to deflect the conversation from herself. “We must thank them all for their hard work and dedication, not excluding the poor young gentlemen who are lying abed and missed it all. Tell us, Mrs. Hardcastle, ma’am, how were they going on when you left?”

Thus she diverted the conversation, and his lordship, who was not enjoying the oblique references to the charms of a woman he unaccountably was beginning to think of as his own, took the opportunity to announce that sherry or Madeira was available for the gentlemen who preferred that to tea. He was certainly one of them.

I’m a product of a convent boarding school in the south of England in the 1950’s and early 60’s. You can probably guess I received an old-fashioned education. I learned a great deal about the humanities and practically nothing in the sciences. I understand Latin, speak French fluently and my German isn’t bad. I read the Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English when I was 16 and Shakespeare is an open book. But the only science I remember is the ditty: Miss Cummings (our teacher) was a scientist, alas she is no more, for what she took for H2O (water) was H2SO4 (sulfuric acid). Not bad, eh? Words to live by.

I met my American husband while working in Brussels (Belgium). Then we moved to Bonn (Germany).  I had three children in a foreign tongue. If you want to know how to say “push” in French and German, ask me!

I’ve lived in the USA for over 40 years, have seven grandchildren and the same husband I started with. We live in a small town in upstate New York but nowadays spend the winter in Florida. I need to sell lots of books so we can buy a waterfront condo! (laughs ironically).

I love my garden, telling my grandchildren stories and eating desserts.  I’d give up a steak for a Key Lime Pie any day!

I began writing Regency Romances just under two years ago after the death of my beloved sister who was in the convent with me all those years ago. We used to read them under the covers with a torch after lights out. My books are dedicated to her.

I’ve so far indie published three.  The third, Rosemary or Too Clever to Love, just came out at the beginning of May.  I’m writing a fourth and editing a trilogy I wrote 18 months ago. I plan on publishing them over the summer.

I love Regency Romances and they’ve always been a guilty pleasure. I was a French professor, and I tell you, after a day of teaching Existentialism, you need a bit of sprigged muslin and some polished topboots to clear your head.  

But more than that, I think they fulfil a need for order and calm that is so lacking in our lives today.  You know that Almack’s is only going to allow entry to men in white britches; you know young ladies may only dance twice with the same man at the ball; you know the couple is going to get together, no matter how mismatched they appear, or how many obstacles are in their path.

There is something soothing about it all.  Of course, it’s escapism and it’s often silly, but it’s always satisfying.

Having been a teacher for 30 years, I find I can’t get away from the urge to provoke discussion. Plus, I belong to three Book Groups. I’ve therefore included Discussion Topics at the end of my last two novels. I hope my readers will have fun with them. 

Posted in Blog Blitz, Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

The Scoundrel’s Bartered Bride 5* #Review @VirginiaHeath_ @MillsandBoon #PublicationDayPush @rararesources #RachelsRandomResources #HistoricalFiction #HistoricalRomance #RegencyRomance #BookReview

Marriage…To the highest bidder

Lady Lydia Barton cannot seem to avoid Owen Wolfe since he returned after being wrongly transported for stealing her family’s jewels! But Lydia has more pressing problems―like her impending arranged marriage. Until Owen makes her father a counter-offer for her hand. Is Owen purely after her society connections? Or does Lydia dare hope that the charming stable boy she once loved is still within her ruthless, wealthy new husband?

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

The attraction, hurt and tension radiate from both characters who meet again with their situations reversed. Lydia feels Owen betrayed her by stealing from her family. Owen was innocent, but he was still convicted and sent to a penal colony. Now an unconventional success has he returned for revenge?

The witty retorts and simmering passion between Lydia and Owen make this a slow burn romance as they overcome their emotional angst, caused by their past. Lydia is in immediate danger, and Owen uses intelligence and streetwise skill to save her from the marriage from hell. Lydia has known little love and finds trusting Owen difficult. Her character develops favourably, as realises Owen was a victim of deceit.

The characters are believable, the setting authentic and the story the perfect escape.

Virginia Heath

When Virginia Heath was a little girl it took her ages to fall asleep, so she made up stories in her head to help pass the time while she was staring at the ceiling. As she got older, the stories became more complicated, sometimes taking weeks to get to the happy ending. Then one day, she decided to embrace insomnia and start writing them down. Despite that, it still takes her forever to fall asleep.

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*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Giveaway Link above.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will be passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for the fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

From Cinderella To Countess Annie Burrows 4*#Review @NovelistaAnnie @MillsandBoon #RegencyRomance #historicalromance #BookReview #MillsandBoonInsiders #MillsandBoonHistorical #MondayBlogs #MondayMotivation #FromCinderellaToCountess

From Cinderella in the shadows

To Countess in the spotlight?

Lady’s companion Eleanor Mitcham longs to escape her unhappy life. Having been told she’s too lowly to speak to Lord Lavenham, Eleanor defiantly accepts his challenge to teach her employer a lesson—by marrying him! He is an eligible earl after all! However, his determinedly cynical view of marriage makes her dissolve their convenient betrothal and flee—leaving the drama of the household behind and Lord Lavenham hot on her heels!

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Eleanor sadly fits the role of Cinderella in her life of drudgery as a paid companion. Peter Earl of Lavenham owns the house where her employer lives and often visits. Eleanor and Peter become friends of sorts until her employer warns Eleanor off and forbids her to see him at the house. What follows involves a Cinderella escape into the night where she meets her fairy godmother, of sorts.
Meeting the Dowager Duchess from ‘The Scandal of the season adds plenty of humour and intrigue.

An enjoyable gently paced, Regency romance full of vivid characters and vibrant settings.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Fiction, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

Wicked By Design Katy Moran 5*#Review #KatyMoran @HoZ_Books #HistoricalFiction #HistoricalRomance #AlternativeHistory #NineteenthCentury #Cornwall #Russia #BookReview

1819.

CORNWALL.
Four women sit in the candlelit drawing-room at Nansmornow, an ancient Cornish manor house. The air is thick with unspoken suspicion and secret malice. As Hester Lamorna pours tea for her three guests, she has no idea one of them is about to rock her new marriage to its very foundations.

ST PETERSBURG.
Half a world away, Hester’s impossible and charmismatic husband, Jack ‘Crow’ Crowlas, will be caught up in a chess game of sexual manipulation, played out across the sumptuous ballrooms of St Petersburg. All Hester and Crow hold most dear will be tested to the limit and beyond: their love for each other and their child, and for Crow, the loyalty of his only brother.

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Head of Zeus via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Set in the early nineteenth century in an alternative historical world where Napolean, not Wellington triumphed at Waterloo. This story is an engaging mix of betrayal, intrigue, passion and politics.

Jack Crow is Lord Lamorna of Cornwall, a man who flaunts convention and lives close to the wire. Haunted by his past actions, his fight for justice and his passions, he is reminiscent of Poldark. Hester, Lady Lamorna is independently minded but loyal and in love with her husband. Her spirit and vulnerability make her a similar character to Poldark’s Demelza.

Engaging and easy to empathise the main protagonists’ complexity and flaws make them relatable. Vivid Cornish and Russian settings with an alternative historical twist give this story its uniqueness. Well-written believable characters and cleverly plotted intrigue and passion, all make this story an addictive, exciting read.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

The Mysterious Miss Fairchild Sarah Mallory 5*#Review @SarahMRomance @MillsandBoon #MillsandBoonInsiders #RegencyRomance #MillsandBoonHistorical #intrigue #mystery #BookReview #BlogTour

Natalya Fairchild can’t help but be drawn to Tristan Quintrell, Lord Dalmorren, with his effortless charisma, even if he’s not her intended bridegroom. Tristan is an eligible society catch…whereas Natalya’s unknown heritage could label her ruined! As he helps Natalya investigate her mysterious past, she starts to hope the truth of her conception won’t destroy her prospects…of a life with Tristan!

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Engaging romance, intriguing mystery and sizzle of passion make this a delightful Regency romance.
Natalya and Tristan are well-matched in both attraction and intelligence. The obstacles to true love are many, but fate throws the two would-be lovers together, in the most scandalous circumstances with a happy conclusion.

Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Historical Fiction, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

The Scandal of the Season Annie Burrows 4*#Review @MillsandBoon @NovelistaAnnie #MillsandBoonInsiders #MillsandBoonHistorical #Regency #Secrets #Lies #RegencyRomance #HistoricalFiction #BookReview

Having saved Cassandra Furnival from scandal once before, it shouldn’t have surprised Colonel Nathaniel Fairfax that she was now attempting to lay siege to the Ton’s eligible bachelors! Determined to thwart her plans, he’s as astounded by her defiance as by her beauty. But nothing shocks the jaded soldier more than discovering her innocence. Restoring her reputation is set to bring about the scandal of the season!

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

Cassie’s life has not been easy after a youthful scandal ruined her in Regency society’s eyes. She lives with a distant relation and her partner and works as a seamstress. When a Dowager Duchess, her godmother wants to take her to London for the season. She is unsure, but the Dowager is manipulative, and so with the blessing of her surrogate aunts she agrees. The rumblings of her former scandal haunt her, brought to life with a threat of new scandal when Nathaniel Fairfax, storms into her life.

The story takes a while to set the scene, but the complex characters and relatable themes explored hold your interest until the passionate romance and dangerous misunderstanding explode in the story’s second half.

Full of conflicts both internal and external, Regency society at its most devastatingly cutting and a cast of vibrant Regency characters, this story is a lovely way to escape the present-day problems.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance, Romance

My Fake Rake Eva Leigh 5*#Review #UnionoftheRakes @MillsandBoon @EvaLeighAuthor #MillsandBoonHistorical #MillsandBoonInsiders #BookReview #HistoricalFiction #RegencyRomance

#MyFakeRake

Lady Grace Wyatt is content as a wallflower, focusing on scientific pursuits rather than the complications of society matches. But when a handsome, celebrated naturalist returns from abroad, Grace wishes, for once, to be noticed. Her solution: to create the perfect man to act as her suitor, and help her catch his eye. Grace’s colleague, anthropologist Sebastian Holloway, is just the blank slate she requires.

To further his own research on English society, Sebastian agrees to let Grace transform him from a bespectacled, bookish academic into a dashing – albeit fake – rake. Between secret lessons on how to be a rogue and exaggerated public flirtations, Grace’s feelings for Sebastian grow from friendship into undeniable, inconvenient, real attraction. If only she hadn’t asked him to help her marry someone else…

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

The story begins in an unusual way for a Regency romance, five boys at Eton, awaiting punishment for various misdemeanours. How is this related to the story? Well, it’s at Eton where the ‘Union of Rakes’ is created. Sebastian, clever but frequently bullied is the first hero in this series, and he is a character that you can’t help liking.

Grace is studious and independent, her looks draw suitors, but her frightening intelligence, unusual hobby and forthright manner soon have them scuttling away for easier conquests. She is drawn to a fellow scientist, but he fails to see her as a suitable partner, something that shouldn’t bother her but does. Enlisting Sebastian her like-minded friend’s help is an act of desperation and trust and begins a story that is full of friendship, humour and romance.

The friends to lovers trope are frequently used, but the lightness of the author’s touch manages to instil something fresh into it. Grace and Sebastian are both vulnerable, and this makes them easier to like. Inevitably, their perception of each other changes. Although predictable, the mutual attraction is nicely done, and the conflicts and misunderstandings make the inevitable passionate encounter hard-won. The story flows well, with all the trappings of Regency society and excellent supporting characters, many will be the stars of other books in the series.

With many Regency romances focusing on the darker side of life, this is a refreshing change. An enjoyable way to escape contemporary problems for awhile.

Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Historical Fiction, Historical Romance, Regency Romance

Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart Audrey Harrison 4* #Review @AudreyHarrison2 @rararesources #BlogTour #BookReview #RegencyRomance #HistoricalFiction #LadyEdithsLonelyHeart

A dashing tale of romance from a bestselling author of Regency Romance.

She is under pressure to find a husband she doesn’t want.

He keeps to the fringes of society because of family constraints.

Will the written word be enough to bring two lost souls together?

Lady Edith Longdon is an heiress, in danger of being classed a spinster, and disillusioned with the fops, dandies, and fortune hunters surrounding her in society. Deciding it’s time to take her future into her own hands, she devises a foolproof way of finding someone she can love. She’s convinced nothing could go wrong…

Lord Ralph Pensby, overwhelmed by a sense of obligation, and with no one he can turn to, is adrift from those around him…

Two people drawn together, both on a journey which will affect them in ways they could never have foreseen. Secret correspondence, mistrust and confusion, not to mention cads of the highest order, make this novel a fast-paced, heart-warming story, with appealing characters and a strong sense of time and place.

Perfect for lovers of all things Regency.

Amazon UK Amazon

I received a copy of this book from the author in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

There’s no doubt what historical period you’re in when you start reading this book, From the authentic Regency styled lady on the cover, to the quintessential Regency dialogue and setting, you are taken back to another time. This story flows well, the plot is simple but effective.

Ralph is the archetypal Regency hero, attractive, troubled, and unsuitable. He has a dark family secret, which keeps him withdrawn from society, but in reality, the fact he is afraid of sharing it is more an indictment on Regency society than anything else. His attraction to Edith grows, but he knows he can never marry.

Edith is fortunate, in that she is independently wealthy, but she wants a family, yet can find nobody she truly wants to marry. Whilst, marriage against her will, is unlikely, her mother is less than supportive and she relies on the counsel of her brother, Miles. Edith is an independent spirit, but she is drawn to Ralph, seeing something worth having beneath the grim exterior he lets the rest of the world see.

This is a conflicted romance, with deceit, secrets and strict Regency society rules, conspiring against Edith and Ralph’s happiness. Trust is also an issue. The chemistry simmers in a genteel way, rising, in keeping with this story’s traditional style. It’s nostalgic to read this style of Regency romance, and I enjoyed it.

Audrey Harrison

AMAZONUK KINDLE STORYTELLER COMPETITION FINALIST 2018!

Audrey was born about two hundred years too late. She wants to belong to a time when men were men and women were dressed in gowns and could float, simper and sigh.

In the real world she has always longed to write, writing a full manuscript when she was fourteen years old. Work, marriage and children got in the way as they do and it was only when an event at work landed her in hospital that she decided to take stock. One Voluntary Redundancy later, she found that the words and characters came to the forefront and the writing began in earnest.

So, although at home more these days, the housework is still neglected and meals are still late on the table, but she has an understanding family, who usually shake their heads at her and sigh. That is a sign of understanding, isn’t it?

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Posted in Book Review, Historical Romance, Regency Romance, Romance

The Secrets of Lord Lynford Bronwyn Scott 5*#Review @MillsandBoon @Bronwynscott #TheCornishDukes #MillsandBoonHistorical #RegencyRomance #HistoricalFiction #Cornwall #Secrets #MillsandBoonInsiders #BookReview

#TheSecretsofLordLynford

He’s destined never to marry
She might change his mind…

Eaton Falmage, Marquess of Lynford, is an expert at distracting himself from the painful truth which means he’ll never wed. Seducing mining widow Eliza Blaxland seems the perfect diversion. Until he learns Eliza guards her heart as fiercely as her hard-won independence. He longs for more, but that would mean confessing his secret…and risk losing her forever!

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A lovely start to what promises to be a riveting romantic series about the heirs of the Cornish Dukes. Eaton has a secret, which in his eyes means he can never marry, so he fills his days helping others with his philanthropy, and taking lovers who never invest their hearts, only their bodies. Losing his mentor, the father of one of his dearest friends hits him hard, and he returns to Cornwall to ensure the school, his mentor believed in, comes to fruition. There he meets Eliza, who is nothing like he expected and he starts to wish his life could be different.

Eliza an independent widow, with a young child, mourns the death of her much older husband, but relishes in the control of her destiny, something she vows, never to give up. Her encounter with Eaton is unsettling, and soon she begins to wonder if she can have him, and her independence.

A tale of emancipation and treachery, this Cornish romance has intrigue, seemingly insurmountable conflicts, deceit and danger for Eliza and Eaton. The chemistry builds steadily, and believably. The romance keeps pace with inevitable requiting of their passion. Eaton and Eliza are complex, relatable characters, and you soon begin to root for them, and their love.

The interesting plot has a good cast of characters and a definite thread of intrigue and danger. It portrays well, the misogynous views of the male-dominated ruling class, at this time. Reflecting how emancipated and enlightened Eliza and Eaton are. The romance is heartwarming with many passionate encounters and the ending is exciting and ultimately happy.