Posted in Book Review, Cozy Mystery, Historical Crime Fiction, Murder Mystery

Murder on the Pier Merryn Allingham 5*#Review @MerrynWrites @bookouture #Historical #CrimeFiction #cosycrime #cozymystery #1950s #Sussex #village #rural #BookReview #FloraSteeleMystery #MurderonthePier #KindleUnlimited


Meet Flora Steele – bookshop owner, bicycle-rider, daydreamer and amateur detective.

Sussex, 1955: When bookshop owner Flora Steele goes for a walk along the pier she isn’t expecting to spot a young woman’s body in the stormy waters below. And she’s shocked to discover the victim is someone she knows…

Convinced the death was not an accident, Flora persuades attractive local crime writer Jack Carrington to help her find out what really happened to poor Polly Dakers, a popular young woman with a complicated love life, who’d been at the heart of village life in Abbeymead.

Jack is reluctant to get involved in another murder case at first but even he can’t deny that Polly’s fall seems fishy. An argument at a party, a missed hairdresser’s appointment and a red woollen bobble found on the wooden boards where Polly last stood provide a trail of clues…

As they grow closer to solving the puzzling mystery, the unlikely pair stumble upon several surprising secrets about those closest to Polly. A number of potential suspects begin to emerge. But who really disliked Polly enough to kill her? Was it Raymond, her jilted first love? Harry, her latest beau? Or Evelyn, Harry’s jealous estranged wife?

As the investigation brings them closer to the truth, Flora is intent on unmasking the killer – but will her stealthy sleuthing lead her down a dangerous path?

An utterly delightful cosy crime novel set in the fictional Sussex village of Abbeymead. 

Amazon UK

My Thoughts…

Murder on the Pier is book two in the Flora Steele Mystery series, and as I already know the characters and the village, it was even better than book one. It’s a complete story, but the series is lovely and quick to read, so it’s best to start at the beginning.

The story immerses the reader in the place and time. The plot has numerous suspects and a definite sinister ethos culminating in a breathtaking finale. Flora is a complex and engaging amateur sleuth, and her partnership with Jack is believable and exciting.

Read my review of the Bookshop Murder