Posted in Book Review, Friendship, Romance

Her Billionaire Protector Nina Singh 4*#Review @ninasinghauthor @MillsandBoon #Romance #MillsandBoonTrueLove #MillsandBoonInsiders #BookReview

He must protect her at all costs… Even from himself! Security company CEO Adam Steele cannot believe that beautiful, poised piano prodigy Ani Terrance is his new client. She’s nothing like the little sister of his best friend he remembers – and she’s tempting him with a sensuality that has him longing for more. Only she doesn’t know the darkness he struggles with… Can he risk letting the one woman he’s always wanted into his heart? 

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A gently paced friends to lovers/forbidden romance, with an original setting and sizzling chemistry between Ani and Adam.

The setting and background of this story take the reader to glamorous places. Ani, a concert pianist is giving a couple of solos concerts in Europe. The possibility she may have a stalker necessitates her overprotective brother calling in the best to protect her. That’s Adam, the CEO of an A list security firm and his best friend. Adam has always hidden his feelings for Ani, his best friends sister, but now she successful and stunning, and he is on close protection duty.

The chemistry created between the couple is conflicted but intense. They become emotionally involved quickly due to their past connection. Even though Adam knows he is overstepping professional boundaries, his attraction is too real to ignore. Ani has always loved Adam on some level. Now she wants a relationship with him. He resists for professional reasons and personal fears, but she knows what she wants.

The romance is gentle moving to passionate when they are close. This is a closed-door romance, but it doesn’t stop it being full of passion and seemingly insurmountable internal conflict.

A simple plot and glitzy setting, with a hint of danger, and an intense romance, the perfect escapist read.

Posted in Biography, Blog Tour, Book Review, Crime, Non-Fiction

18 Tiny Deaths: The Untold Story of Frances Glessner Lee and the Invention of Modern Forensics Bruce Goldfarb 3*#Review @bruce_goldfarb @Octopus_Books #18TinyDeaths #ForensicScience #Biography #nonfiction #RandomThingsTours @annecater

For most of human history, sudden and unexpected deaths of a suspicious nature, when they were investigated at all, were examined by lay persons without any formal training. People often got away with murder. Modern forensic investigation originates with Frances Glessner Lee – a pivotal figure in police science.

Frances Glessner Lee (1878-1962), born a socialite to a wealthy and influential Chicago family, was never meant to have a career, let alone one steeped in death and depravity. Yet she became the mother of modern forensics and was instrumental in elevating homicide investigation to a scientific discipline.

Frances Glessner Lee learned forensic science under the tutelage of pioneering medical examiner Magrath – he told her about his cases, gave her access to the autopsy room to observe post-mortems and taught her about poisons and patterns of injury. A voracious reader too, Lee acquired and read books on criminology and forensic science – eventually establishing the largest library of legal medicine.

Lee went on to create The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death – a series of dollhouse-sized crime scene dioramas depicting the facts of actual cases in exquisitely detailed miniature – and perhaps the thing she is most famous for. Celebrated by artists, miniaturists and scientists, the Nutshell Studies are a singularly unusual collection. They were first used as a teaching tool in homicide seminars at Harvard Medical School in the 1930s, and then in 1945 the homicide seminar for police detectives that is the longest-running and still the highest-regarded training of its kind in America. Both of which were established by the pioneering Lee.

In 18 Tiny Deaths, Bruce Goldfarb weaves Lee’s remarkable story with the advances in forensics made in her lifetime to tell the tale of the birth of modern forensics.

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Octopus Books in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

This biography explores significant forensic science developments and Frances Glessner Lee’s role in them. Focusing predominately on North American forensic science, the book sets the scene by highlighting defects of the legal-medico and Coroner’s system, before the development of modern forensic science.

Details of Frances Glessner Lee’s ancestry, upbringing and life, show how remarkable her legacy is, at a time when women were sidelined by society. This is a biography of a notable woman, interwoven with developments in forensic science. For those who enjoy historical biographies, her life is intrinsically interesting. Frances’ interest in making miniature figures and pieces is documented, something which she later used for teaching purposes in forensic science.

Early developments in forensic science and crimes and the development of the medical examiner role and autopsy are explored through case studies and historical characters. Lee’s role in developing a department of legal medicine is documented in detail. As are the model scenes she creates, these are illustrated.

This is a factual, interesting biography, which will appeal to those, interested in the origins of, and players in, forensic science in North America.

Bruce Goldfarb

Bruce Goldfarb is the executive assistant to the Chief Medical Examiner for the State of Maryland, US, where the Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death are housed. He gives conducted tours of the facility and is also a trained forensic investigator. He began his career as a paramedic before working as a journalist, reporting on medicine, science and health.

He collaborated with Susan Marks – the documentary filmmaker who produced the 2012 film about Frances Glessner Lee and the Nutshells titled Of Dolls and Murder.