Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Extract, Romance, Romantic Comedy

The House at Greenacres – Darcie Boleyn – 4*#Review #BlogTour #Extract @canelo_co @DarcieBoleyn #RomanticComedy #Cornwall #MothersDay #WeekendReads #SundayMorning

All roads lead home…

When Holly Dryden fled Penhallow Sands nearly a year ago she was determined to put the past – and Rich Turner – behind her. But now an unexpected loss and financial trouble have led her back to the family vineyard and it’s time to tell Rich the truth – he’s a father.

Surrounded by the memories of what they once shared Holly’s anger fades in the glow of Rich’s undeniable love for their son and the way he selflessly steps in to help the vineyard out of trouble. As Holly watches Rich flourish in his new role as father to baby Luke, she realises that though they can’t change the past, the future is still theirs to write…

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Extract from The House at Greenacres – Darcie Boleyn

Rich was trying to concentrate on what a client was telling him, but his mind kept drifting to the text he’d received from Holly. She did want to meet with him today. He’d known it would happen sooner or later, but he’d thought it would take her a while to settle back in and to grieve for her grandpa. He’d also thought she might not want to see him, that she might try to delay it, as he couldn’t imagine that he was her favourite person – father of her child or not.

There were cafés and pubs in Penhallow Sands, but the chances of being left alone to talk for any length of time were slim, as people who hadn’t seen Holly for some time would want to pass on their condolences and catch up with her. He could suggest heading into Newquay, but again, they might not get any privacy, and that was something he thought their conversation would require. There was only one place he could think of for what he imagined was going to prove to be an emotional meeting.

As soon as his client had gone, he replied to Holly’s text, asking her to meet him at 5.30 that afternoon at the old spot. Holly would know where he meant. He’d be able to get there by then as long as he clocked off straight after his final meeting of the day.

Since the funeral on Monday, the atmosphere at his parents’ cottage had been strained. His mother was trying her best not to pester him about Holly and the baby, but it was obvious that she was struggling with it. She wanted to know if Holly would stay in Penhallow Sands if she would be able to spend time with her grandchild. Rich too wanted to know the answers to those questions, and yet he was terrified of finding out either way. He knew now that Luke was his, but he and Holly had always used contraception and it had never failed them before, so he was confused about how it had happened. If Luke had been conceived despite contraception and Holly’s condition – which she’d been told in her teens could affect her fertility – then he was meant to be. Against the odds, he had arrived – a beautiful, healthy baby boy.

Then there was the other matter to consider. Rich had always believed he never wanted children. After what had happened to Dean, he’d sworn never to open himself up to hurt like that again, never to put himself through what his parents had endured. Why would anyone take that risk? And it had all been his fault – Dean’s death, their parents’ suffering; all because of Rich’s stupidity and weakness.

His heart was racing and his palms were clammy; he knew what was happening. He had to get control of this before it consumed him. His life had moved on to a better place; he would not let the old anxieties resume their hold on him.

He closed his eyes and focused on his breathing – in for four, out for four. He felt the air rushing into his lungs, then he pushed it back out, emptying his chest until he needed to fill it again. He opened his mind to the scenery from Ibiza, imagined the sounds of the waves lapping at the shore and the sensation as he walked into the water and felt its warm, soothing embrace.

Tension gone, he drifted …

‘Rich?’

He opened his eyes to find Sam standing in the doorway.

‘You okay?’

He nodded, blinking away his meditation.

‘Just overthinking things, so I needed to mentally check out for five minutes.’

Sam smiled. ‘Did it work?’

‘Like a charm.’

‘Good. You want to grab an early lunch then have a walk along the beach? Get some fresh air?’

‘Wonderful idea.’

Lunch and a walk would be just what he needed before an afternoon of work. Sam really was a good friend.

I received a copy of this book from Canelo via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

This lovely romantic comedy combines second chance romance with an unexpected pregnancy. Set in coastal Cornwall with a host of realistic characters, this is the perfect holiday read.

Holly is a strong female lead, empowered by the birth of her son, she faces up to her past when she returns home for her Grandfather’s funeral. Rich’s life has not been easy, and losing Holly through his actions makes him keen to explore whether they have a second chance at happiness.

The plot is simple, but the characters make it enjoyable, with romance, humour, and more than a little angst making the path to true happiness for Holly and Rich peppered with conflict both internal and from external interference. The outcome is worth the rollercoaster ride and you’re left with a heartwarming feeling at the end.

If you’re looking for an escapist read on Mother’s Day (UK), with vivid characters, a delightful coastal setting and a lovely blend of angst, humour and romance this is the perfect fit.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is author-image.jpg

Darcie Boleyn has a huge heart and is a real softy. She never fails to cry at books and movies, whether the ending is happy or not. Darcie is in possession of an overactive imagination that often keeps her awake at night. Her childhood dream was to become a Jedi but she hasn’t yet found suitable transport to take her to a galaxy far, far away. She also has reservations about how she’d look in a gold bikini, as she rather enjoys red wine, cheese and loves anything with ginger or cherries in it – especially chocolate. Darcie fell in love in New York, got married in the snow, rescues uncoordinated greyhounds and can usually be found reading or typing away on her laptop.

Posted in Book Review, Book Spotlight, Poetry

The Cotswold Calendar – Tony Stowell – Illustrator – Lorna Gray – Spotlight and 4* #Review #WeekendRead #SaturdayThoughts #SaturdayMotivation #SaturdayMorning @MsLornaGray @CrumpsBarn

The seasons roll across the ancient landscape of the Cotswolds, running from Broadway to Bath, Tetbury to Cirencester and many places between.

Beautiful, characterful and often witty, the patterns of the passing months and local traditions are captured here in a joyful celebration in verse of this truly unforgettable region of England.

With photographs, watercolour sketches and maps of each location, join Gloucestershire poet Tony Stowell on his deeply personal tour of the Cotswolds.

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I received a copy of this book from the Illustrator in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A lovely medley of poetry, hand-drawn maps, illustrations and photographs make ‘The Cotswold Calendar’ something to treasure. Whether you live in the area, are planning to visit, or like me, appreciate beautiful things, there is something for you here.

The poet’s impressions of each month in The Cotswolds, form a chapter in the book, accompanied by places of note, also described in verse. At the beginning of the book the author describes the verse form, and its technicalities, so even a layperson like me, can understand how the verse is structured and its intended impact.

Extract from ‘The Cotswold Calendar’ – Tony Stowell

The poetry is full of imagery that brings to mind the spotlight month. Similarly, notable calendar events are described in verse for many iconic Cotswold villages and towns. Accompanied by monochrome photo images and illustrations, which enhance the verse and reinforce the poetic images, it makes a wonderful guide book to the area.

Easy to read, for lovers of verse, it is also a wonderful reference work for The Cotswold tourist, to ensure you don’t miss, the beauty and community of this English treasure.

Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Family Drama, Friendship, Guest post, Romance

My Husband’sWives- Faith Hogan – 5* #Review #GuestPost @HoZ_Books @Aria_Fiction @GerHogan #Paperback #BlogTour #Family #Drama #Friendship #Romance

Is it better to have loved and lost, then never to have loved?

Paul Starr, Ireland’s leading cardiologist, has died in a car crash with a pregnant young woman by his side. A woman who is not his wife.

Evie, Grace and Annalise never thought they’d meet, but now they have to uncover the truth of their pasts. And suddenly they find themselves united by a man they never really knew at all.

As these women begin to form unlikely friendships they discover that Paul’s death could prove to be the catalyst they needed to become the people they always wanted to be…

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I received a copy of this book from Head of Zeus in return for an honest review

My Thoughts…

Three women, one man, it seems that Paul Starr collects wives like other men collect paintings, although he collects those too. In fact, that’s how he met Grace, the starting point for this story. Their attraction is instant and unsettling, she knows he’s married but is drawn like a moth to the flame, and he seems prepared to give up his former life to share hers. It is not until his untimely demise that Grace realises Paul kept secrets from everyone. Grace is running from commitment, from the drudgery of her early life and mostly from herself.

Evie always felt he loved her best despite Grace, but when he dies unexpectedly, she finds out Grace is not the only one. Evie’s story is sad, always living in someone’s shadow, never realising her full potential and now she feels she never will.

Annalise met Paul when she was at an all-time low, he offered her a way of saving face, but somewhere along the way she lost herself. When he died she clings on to her widowhood like a safety net, but maybe falling is better than remaining on the precipice?

Paul is like a child, he wants new toys but doesn’t want to give up his old ones. Unfortunately, his toys are women and their lives are blighted by his treatment. Paul’s lack of awareness is an overriding theme in this story, his character is badly flawed, but despite his controlling and faithless characteristics, as the story progresses, in death he does offer each of his women a precious lifeline.

This story is an excellent family drama and each of the main female characters becomes stronger, it is an empowering book to read. The plot is interesting and whilst the theme is not unusual, it is handled in a unique way and the characters are beautifully written, realistic, flawed, but strong enough to realise they have to accept help from unlikely sources, evolve and most of all forgive – Paul, the other women in his life and most of all themselves.

Lies and secrets are at the heart of this story, but it is courage and transparency that makes it an enjoyable read. Many contemporary issues and attitudes are explored sensitively, and there is a mystery to solve that keeps you guessing. Its resolution ties up the story perfectly.

The relationship that develops between the women is what resonates most in this story, the imagery is vivid, the dialogue realistic, and the plot perfectly paced. This would make a great film.

Guest Post- Faith Hogan

The Ultimate Guide to Being an Irish Reader

It seems, when St. Patrick’s day rolls around each year, more and more people find a little drop of Irish somewhere along the roots of their family tree. It’s a truly wonderful thing, to think that somehow, most of us are connected in some way that’s becoming more traceable as science and research move forward.

Of course, the thing about being Irish is that it’s like being French, it’s as much an attitude to life as it is anything else. Often, it seems that as a nation we’ve been maligned, in terms of being all that goes along with pints of the black stuff and a propensity to curse midstream on the most poetic verses.

I think the things that make us Irish – whether it is esoterically or physically are a little more prosaic…

The most important thing that has set us apart over the centuries is our love for Literature. We’ve been blessed by more than just shamrock, historically with books that stretch all the way back to the Ninth century.

The Book of Kells…. can be visited in Trinity College Library where it’s on permanent display.

Of course, our literary tradition did not begin and end with the monks and academics.

Some of our most famous writers have written across the genres over the last two hundred years. Everyone associates James Joyce and W.B Yeats with the emerald isle, their writing is so richly invested in our green landscape. We are equally proud however of Brahm Stoker who wrote the internationally famous Dracula and Oscar Wilde whose acerbic wit and tragedy lean towards a much more anglicised tradition.

In recent years, I’m not sure you can close or open an Irish cannon without including some of our most treasured and popular writers. Maeve Binchy is a genre to herself at this point and her stories carry within them a heart and warmth that many pretenders may aspire to, but none has so far reached. There is no nicer compliment than being compared to Maeve, but really, I’ve always felt there is only one Queen of the heart stories and her crown remains untouched.

Roddy Doyle writes a very different kind of book to anyone else in the world. It is Irish, it is Dublin and all of his stories are bitingly sharp, poignantly funny and for my money, if we’re comparing, he’s got his finger on the pulse as a modern day Dickens’. Doyle manages to highlight the areas of society we’d rather gloss over and he does it in a way that makes us want to go back for more.

These days, books are a funny thing in Ireland. There are so many fantastic writers out there, a sea of them all bobbing along, but its the ones that make it up onto the big screen that really tend to capture the attention, sometimes to the detriment of equally good books alongside them. One of those books, that made it to the big screen was Brooklyn – based on the wonderful novel by Colm Toibin – if there is a book you think you might read this St. Patrick’s day, this one is light but well written and it is guaranteed to leave you with the whisper of an Irish voice in your ear and a contented smile at the end.

If you’re planning to celebrate St. Patrick’s day with a book, of course, I have to mention, a brand new paperback has just arrived in the shops and it’s called My Husbands Wives and it’s published by Aria Fiction. It’s been compared to all sorts of wonderful writers, but mainly, it’s an unashamedly feel-good story – a blissful escape from these grey days. It’s the story of four women and how they manage to survive and thrive after the unthinkable happens. It is steeped in the warmth, welcome and windy weather of this little emerald isle and it’s guaranteed to leave you feeling as if all is right with the world at the end!

If you do pick it up, I hope you enjoy it!

Faith xxx

Faith lives in the west of Ireland with her husband, four children and two very fussy cats. She has a Hons Degree in English Literature and Psychology, has worked as a fashion model and in the intellectual disability and mental health sector.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Fiction, Romance

A Dangerous Act of Kindness – 4* #Review – L.P.Fergusson @canelo_co @LPFergusson #HistoricalFiction #Romance #PublicationDay

What would you risk for a complete stranger?

When widow Milly Sanger finds injured enemy pilot Lukas Schiller on her farm, the distant war is suddenly at her doorstep. Compassionate Milly knows he’ll be killed if discovered and makes the dangerous decision to offer him shelter from the storm.

On opposite sides of the inescapable conflict, the two strangers forge an unexpected and passionate bond. But as the snow thaws, the relentless fury of World War Two forces them apart, leaving only the haunting memories of what they shared, and an understanding that their secret must never see light.

As Milly’s dangerous act of kindness sets them on paths they never could have expected, those closest to them become their greatest threats, and the consequences of compassion prove deadly…

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Canelo via NetGalley in return or an honest review.

My Thoughts…

An interesting historical fiction book set in WW2, England. The fear of invasion is on everyone’s minds at this time and the fate a German airman crashing to earth if he survives is understandably precarious.

Milly, guilt-ridden over the death of her husband, doesn’t want to help but she sees a fellow human in need of care and lets her humanity rule her head. What follows, is intense, suspenseful and ultimately heartbreaking for the young woman, but the threat of repercussions last for the duration of the war.

The forbidden romance aspect of this story is poignant and sensual. Milly acts from the heart and out of loneliness but also with courage. Lukas wants to fly, but he doesn’t understand the consequences of his youthful choice for many years.

The story spans five years of war and explores what it is like for the rural communities trying to feed Britain, the Londoners bombed and the children evacuated to the relative safety of the countryside. Military intelligence, prisoners of war camps and Britain’s population’s perception of the war, Germans and those who helped them is an important theme of this book.

The bond between Lukas and Milly connects all events in the story, it affects both their lives and happiness in unforeseen ways. They are complex and in many respects tragic characters. Like all the characters in this story, they are authentic and allow the reader to glimpse what Britain at war was like.

The plot is detailed and spans many Britain at war themes. The historical information and imagery make the characters’ actions and motives realistic and the story engages the reader’s emotions as they turn the pages.

My only criticism is that I find it a little slow in parts, but it is an enjoyable yet heartbreaking read. The ending implies rather than shows hope for the future and it is beautifully written.

Posted in Blog Tour, Book Review, Extract, Historical Fiction, Romance

Hetty’s Secret War- Rosie Clarke- #blogtour #4* #Review – #extract @Aria_Fiction @AnneHerries #WW2 #Historical Fiction #Romance

In 1939, with the world on the brink of war, one woman faces a future more uncertain than she had ever imagined…

Georgie – when the man she has always loved is sent to France on a secret war office mission every knock of the door fills her with dread of it being the feared telegram boy…

Beth – orphaned as a child, Beth is coming of age and determined to do her bit for the war effort. Caught up in a whirlwind romance, she marries only to become a war widow….and one expecting a baby who will never know his brave father. Can she find happiness again?

Hetty – desperately trying to make her way back from Paris to her beloved family in England, a fateful and tragic encounter brings Hetty to Chateau de Faubourg where she joins the resistance and risks both her heart and her life fighting for charismatic resistance leader Stefan Lefarge…

However dark the times, courage, determination and the power of friendship can overcome the hardships of war.

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I received a copy of this book from Aria via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

This is the third book in the ‘Women at War’ series, for those readers, like me who haven’t read the previous two books, there is a comprehensive summary at the beginning of the book, with character details and significant events explained and noted.

The story reads well as a standalone, but the characters are complex and the previous storylines intriguing, so that I wish I’d read the whole series. There is a distinctive writing style, in keeping with the time period and some of the dialogue seems a little stilted, but you get used to this, as the characters are believable and easy to like and the plot has many twists.

There is a satisfying balance of action, angst, historical detail and surprisingly sensual romance in this story. Focused primarily on Hetty as she fights a secret war in occupied France, the story also features, Georgie, Beth and to a lesser extent Annabel and Jessie, characters featured in more detail in previous books. Hetty’s story is exciting and shows her character development well.

The plot is interesting and well-paced and the characters are authentic to the time period but endear themselves quickly to the reader, so you become absorbed in their stories and want them to find happiness and peace as World War Two draws to a close.

An enjoyable, historical read, with notable characters and an intriguing plot.

Extract From Hetty’s Secret War

‘War imminent! Children evacuated from London!’

Beth shivered as she heard the strident tones of the newspaper boy standing outside the railway station. She’d had to change trains in London and, having an hour to spare, had gone for a quick shopping trip. Now she saw that the station was crowded. A party of young children were being herded at one end by a harassed-looking woman, who was obviously in charge of getting them to their destination in the country. But most of the travellers appeared to be young men; several of them dressed in army uniforms. Some were saying goodbye to family or girlfriends; others were obviously together and in a boisterous mood.

As she watched them jostling and shoving each other in a good-natured manner, she wondered if one or two had been drinking a little too much. Or perhaps it was a mixture of excitement and nerves. One of them had noticed her glance their way and a loud wolf whistle made her turn her head aside, her cheeks pink.

It wasn’t the first time she’d been whistled at, but being a reserved girl, except with her close friends, she didn’t particularly care for it and decided to make sure she entered a different carriage to the one picked by the party of boisterous young men.

When the train arrived, Beth chose a carriage already occupied by a woman and teenage boy and another young man, who was dressed in the uniform of an army officer. He didn’t look at her as she sat down and Beth settled herself to read a magazine she had bought. However, the train had a corridor rather than being individual closed carriages and she heard the laughter of the noisy young men as they made their way along the train but thankfully bypassed her carriage.

‘Terrible news, isn’t it?’ the woman sitting opposite said to Beth, obliging her to lower her magazine. ‘All those children being evacuated. I shouldn’t want my Marcus to be shipped off to strangers like that. I’m taking him to my sister’s and I’m going to stay put until all this nonsense is over.’

‘I think that’s a good idea,’ Beth said. ‘But I think you may be in for a long visit.’

‘Oh, don’t say that!’ the woman exclaimed. ‘My husband says once they get to grips with the Germans it will all be over in a matter of months. He joined up a couple of days ago, but he’s sure he’ll be home for Christmas. That’s what Daddy said, isn’t it, Marcus?’

‘I want to go and fight the Germans,’ the lad said, giving her a mutinous look. ‘Don’t want to stay with Auntie Peggy.’

‘You’ll like it when you get there. It’s nice in the country.’ She nodded at Beth. ‘Ask that young lady – it’s nice in the country, isn’t it?’

‘I like it,’ Beth replied, eyeing the sullen lad doubtfully. ‘You’ll enjoy exploring and climbing trees, I dare say.’

His mother looked horrified. ‘For goodness’ sake, don’t put ideas in his head. Climbing trees are much too dangerous.’

‘Want to go to the toilet,’ Marcus said. ‘And I feel sick.’

‘You went before we came,’ his harassed mother said and frowned at him. ‘I suppose I’d better take you.’ She looked at Beth. ‘Would you mind keeping an eye on my parcels? I don’t want to cart them all the way to the toilet and back.’

‘Yes, of course,’ Beth said and smiled as she went out.

She happened to glance at the man in army uniform sitting opposite and he grinned at her. ‘I wouldn’t be in her shoes,’ he said. ‘That young chap has been spoiled if you ask me.’

‘Yes, I think he has,’ Beth agreed and looked down at her magazine. She was just beginning to get interested in one of the articles when the door was thrust back and three of the noisy young men she had noticed on the platform entered.

‘Don’t mind if we sit here, do you, darlin’?’ one of them asked with a cheeky grin.

‘Two of the seats are taken,’ Beth said, ‘but there are two available.’

‘Thanks, darlin’,’ the soldier replied. ‘That means you’re out, Charlie. Get orf down the train and we’ll see yer later, mate.’

‘Who are you givin’ yer orders?’ the other replied, but seeing that neither of his friends were about to oblige by giving up the seats they had taken, he scowled and went out.

The soldier with the cheeky grin had chosen to sit next to Beth, his companion sitting in the corner near the door. She felt the pressure of the soldier’s warm body as he deliberately pressed his thigh up against hers. She resisted looking at him, returning to her magazine, although it was only a pretence now because she was conscious of the leering looks the soldier was sending her way.

‘All on your own then, darlin’?’ he asked. ‘Me and me mates are on our way to Torquay. We’ve got a couple of days leave before we join our units see – going to make the most of our time if you get my meaning?’

‘Really,’ Beth said, her heart sinking as she realised that she would have to endure his presence all the way home. ‘That will be nice for you.’

‘Yeah – find ourselves a few girls, have a bevvy or two,’ he said. ‘Do you come from round there, darlin’?’

Rosie is happily married and lives in a quiet village in East Anglia. Writing books is a passion for Rosie, she also likes to read, watch good films and enjoys holidays in the sunshine. She loves shoes and adores animals, especially squirrels and dogs.  
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Posted in Book Review, Crime, Mystery, Psychological Thriller, Suspense

The Greenway – 4* #Review – Jane Adams #mystery #crime #psychological #suspense #detective @JoffeBooks @janeadamsauthor

AUGUST 1975: Cassie Maltham’s life changes forever one scorching day. She and her twelve-year-old cousin Suzie take a shortcut through the Greenway, an ancient pathway steeped in Norfolk legend. Somewhere along this path Suzie simply vanishes . . .

TWENTY YEARS LATER: Cassie is still tormented by nightmares, parts of her memory completely erased. With her husband Fergus and friends Anna and Simon, she returns to Norfolk, determined to confront her fears and solve a mystery that won’t let her rest.

Then another young girl goes missing at the entrance to the Greenway, and Cassie is pushed once more into the darkest recesses of her mind.

John Tynan, the retired detective who’d been in charge of Suzie’s case, is still haunted by her disappearance. He offers his help to Detective Inspector Mike Croft who is leading the increasingly frantic search for the missing child. Has evil returned? And what really happened all those years ago and who can be believed?

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I received a copy of this book from Joffe Books via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A well-written retro, psychological suspense mystery set in Norfolk.

Cassie is the link between two disappearances of young girls. Her cousin Suzie in 1975 and Sara in 1995, whilst Cassie is revisiting the area after twenty years, as part of her mental health rehabilitation.

There is a multi-layered plot, which encompasses many themes; myths and legends, supernatural occurrences, crime, mental health and police procedural. Some of these are explored in detail, like the day to day police activity surrounding the missing child, others like the supernatural elements, and Cassie’s mental state are hinted at but left to the reader’s imagination to decide what to believe.

Mike Croft the SIO in the case is an interesting character, he has a tragic past, which threatens to impinge on his decision-making capacity in the case. John Tynan, a retired detective who was SIO on the previous missing girl case in 1975, sees the similarities between the two cases, and he supports Mike and his team with the new case. His involvement ties up the historical, and present day elements of the story in a realistic way.

The plot twists are good and the final resolution solves the mystery. Some questions remain but, this is intentional, making this an authentic story, as in real life not every aspect of a crime or mystery can be solved in entirety.

I like the retro ethos of the story, it adds to the plot’s level of menace and the mystery. The complex characters, especially Cassie who is the unreliable protagonist in the story are believable.

Overall this fusion of genres works well and makes the story a compelling read.

Posted in Animal Welfare, Book Review, Childrens Books

Mr Dog and the Rabbit Habit – 5*#Review -Ben Fogle- Steve Cole- Illustrator- Nikolas Ilic @HarperCollinsCh @BenFogle @SteveColeBooks @nikolas_ilic #childrensbooks #childrensfiction #animals #dogs #rabbits #conservation

A brand new young fiction series by TV broadcaster and intrepid explorer Ben Fogle, inspired by his real-life animal experiences…

Co-written with best-selling children’s author Steve Cole and illustrated throughout with beautiful black and white illustrations by Nikolas Ilic.

You can always count on Mr Dog to help an animal in trouble…

When a mother rabbit is captured in a trap, he ends up playing bunny sitter

But someone wants rid of All the rabbits, not just this one, and time is running out for Mr Dog to save them…

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Harper Collins Children’s Books via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A refreshingly different children’s illustrated story with wonderful relatable animal characters and an important message, delivered in easy to understand bite size pieces, about animal conservation and welfare. The fun illustrations reinforce the text and make this book suitable for younger children too.

This adventurous and fun story has believable characters with recognisable animal characteristics. It should be a favourite of both children and adults lucky enough to read this book too.

The plot although necessarily simple does have a couple of twists and doesn’t fall into the trap of becoming too sinister or cliche for the intended audience. It deals with contemporary animal husbandry and conservation issues in a readable and understandable way.

Mr Dog is the star, and he is an instant hit with me. Adventurous, clever, courageous, fun and kind, he has desirable personality traits that resonate with children and he makes a good role model.

An enjoyable read for children and their adults and the makings of an important, yet fun series.

Posted in #BookBlogger , #amreading, Book Spotlight, Family Drama, Friendship, Holiday Romance, New Books, Romance, This Week's Books

One Summer in Paris #amreading #SaturdayMorning #books #bookblogger #spotlight #NetGalley @HQStories @SarahMorgan_

One charming bookshop, two unlikely friends, and a summer in Paris that will change their lives forever…

Grace can’t believe it when her husband of twenty-five years announces he doesn’t want to join her on their anniversary trip to Paris – instead, he wants a divorce. Reeling from the shock, Grace makes the bold decision to go on this holiday of a lifetime alone.

Audrey leaves behind heartache of her own when she arrives in Paris. A job in a bookshop is her ticket to freedom, but with no knowledge of the French language, her summer adventure seems doomed to fail. Until she meets Grace and everything changes…

Living in neighbouring apartments above the bookshop, Grace and Audrey form an unlikely friendship. They came to Paris to find themselves, but finding each other might be the best thing that’s ever happened to them.

I received a copy of this book from HQ via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts So Far…

So, I thought I’d share what I’m currently reading this weekend. Sarah Morgan has always been a favourite author, and her new book released by HQ on April 4th 2019, is full of good things.

I have only read about 16 %, so far, we haven’t even reached Paris yet, and I can’t put it down. The two main characters Grace and Audrey are so likeable, despite the emotional wasteland they find themselves in. They are realistic and easy to empathise and I can’t wait to find out what happens in Paris.

There is also a collection of subsidiary characters that resonate, but not always in a good way, but that’s a true reflection of life, isn’t it?

I will post my review of this story in early April, but in the meantime, if you are looking for a great holiday read, with angst, romance, family drama and friendship, this is a contender.

Posted in Book Review, Historical Fiction, Historical Romance, Mystery

A Tale of Two Sisters – Merryn Allingham 5*#Review @canelo_co @MerrynWrites #historicalfiction #historicalromance #fridayreads

Separated by time and distance, two sisters seek answers for all they’ve lost

When Alice Verinder’s beloved sister Lydia goes missing, Alice boards the Orient Express bound for Topkapi Palace in Constantinople, determined to find her.

Lydia was governess to the Sultan’s young children and though her letters spoke of exotic delights and welcoming hosts, the reception Alice receives is decidedly cold and answers unforthcoming.

Now, as Alice digs deeper into the secrets of a land foreign to her she has only Englishman Harry Frome to help her. But as their search uncovers unforeseen dangers and exposes an unexpected ardour, is Alice ready for the truths they’ll uncover?

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Canelo via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

A beautifully told story of sisterly love, impetus youth,
and evil. The Tale of Two Sisters is set in the vibrant historical background of early twentieth century Turkey. Full of vivid imagery and intricate historical details, you can imagine the opulence and the culture the two sisters experience.

The plot is believable and well thought out, the twists and turns, which keep the reader guessing are plentiful and the mystery keeps its terrible secrets to the end.

Lydia is a woman before her time, driven by political equality, yet naive and ill-equipped for what she becomes embroiled in. She is selfish and flawed, but her exuberance and zest for life’s experiences make this forgivable, Ultimately she becomes a heroine.

Alice is the antithesis of her sister, dependable, selfless and resigned to subjugating her needs for the good of her parents and sibling. She is easy to empathise. Her courage is notable and as the story progresses her adventurous and impulse qualities come to the fore, making her share more with her sister than you would first imagine.

Gentle pacing reflects the many obstacles Alice faces as she tries to discover her sister’s whereabouts. Told from both sisters’ points of view, the story is full of emotion, historical interest and suspense, as the mystery surrounding Lydia’s disapperance is solved. There is also a tender, unexpected romance, which adds extra depth to the story and allows its ending to be hopeful.

If like me, you love historical fiction with a mystery to solve, and just a touch of gentle romance, this lovely tale will draw you in.

Posted in Book Review, Romance, Romance -Dark and Steamy

The Good Girl – 5*#Review- Christy McKellen @MillsandBoon @ChristyMcKellen #PublicationDay #Dare #DoYouDare #Romance

One week of pleasure…

With an Italian bad boy!

Academic Juno Darlington-Hume wants a top-quality education—in sexual pleasure! Renowned Italian playboy Alessandro Ricci agrees to show the gorgeous virgin almost everything he knows… From magical Florence to the golden Tuscan countryside, he’s taking her to ever higher peaks of ecstasy, letting her get closer than any other woman. But he’ll never take the one thing she truly wants to give him—her heart.

Amazon UK

I received a copy of this book from Mills and Boon via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

My Thoughts…

There’s no denying this story is full of sensual romance, it’s a sizzling read, as Alessandro teaches Juno everything she needs to know. This story also has emotional depth. What starts out a purely physical encounter, deepens with self-realisation and trust into something much deeper and dangerous for the playboy and the naive woman.

Both Juno and Alessandro have low self-esteem. She is clever but feels socially inept, in comparison to her successful sisters and remote father. He uses his looks and sexual prowess to hide the inadequacy he feels. He’s artistic but is forced to deny his true skills, by a family concerned only with status and wealth.

The vulnerability of both characters makes the final conflicts they face, appear insurmountable, but the self-development they achieve from their emotional relationship makes them brave enough to strive for what they really want and need.

A sensual romance with good character development and a lovely romantic ending.