Posted in Book Review, New Books

5* Review : Wendy Lou Jones – The Summer We Loved

cover70495-medium

Poppy - Blurb

Forgiving yourself can be the hardest task of all.
Dr Peter Florin is the sexy bad boy of St Steven’s hospital. Despite his love ‘em and leave ‘em attitude, every woman still wants him – and nurse Jenny White is no exception. For one night she thought she saw the real Pete, but ever since then he’s kept his distance and so she has kept hers…

Only Pete is a man haunted by a dark childhood and a tragic loss, and as she watches him spiral down into despair, Jenny realises she might be the only one who can drag him back. So she does – at the risk of her own, already bruised and battered heart. For no matter what she tells herself, such a man is surely impossible to change – and even more impossible to resist.

Flowers - Buy Links
Amazon UK
Amazon

Flowers - My Review

The Summer We LovedThe Summer We Loved’ is medical romance with a twist, which makes it uniquely memorable and poignant. A chance meeting between Jenny and Pete sets the scene and from the first chapter you realise Jenny is telling this story for a purpose but what is it?

The characters are deep and realistic. Jenny is dedicated to everything she undertakes, almost driven and as her story unfolds it’s easy to understand why. Drawn to Pete, the antithesis of everything she believes in, yet too reticent to do anything about it; until she realises he needs her, even if he doesn’t realise it yet. Pete is complex and dark. He hides his demons and plays the fool and because of this is hard to empathise with until Jenny unpicks his barriers and reveals the frightened little boy hiding behind them.

The plot takes many turns but is so interesting you can’t stop reading. The emotion is raw and sometimes painful to witness but there is nothing gratuitous in this story, every tear counts and adds to the rich fabric of the tale Jenny recounts. The ending is full of angst, maintains the emotional pressure and completes the story beautifully.

I received a copy of this book from Harper Impulse via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

The Summer We Loved by Wendy Lou Jones
My rating: 5 of 5 stars


The Summer We Loved by Wendy Lou Jones

Wendy Lou Jones

Jane Hunt Writer First Steps
Jane Hunt Writer Book Reviews Facebook
Jane Hunt Writer Book Reviews Google+

View all my reviews

Posted in Book Review, New Books

4* Review:The Tea Planter’s Wife – Dinah Jefferies

25237718
Poppy - Blurb

Nineteen-year-old Gwendolyn Hooper is newly married to a rich and charming widower, eager to join him on his tea plantation, determined to be the perfect wife and mother.

But life in Ceylon is not what Gwen expected. The plantation workers are resentful, the neighbours treacherous. And there are clues to the past – a dusty trunk of dresses, an overgrown gravestone in the grounds – that her husband refuses to discuss.

Just as Gwen finds her feet, disaster strikes. She faces a terrible choice, hiding the truth from almost everyone, but a secret this big can’t stay buried forever . . .
Flowers - Buy Links

Amazon UK

Flowers - My Review

The Tea Planter's Wife by Dinah JefferiesAn atmospheric story with strong characters, well researched historical detail and honest insight into the prejudices of the between-wars era.

Gwen is a naive, privileged young bride, with no idea what to expect from her new life. The story captures Gwen’s emotions perfectly. The reader follows her character development and increasing maturity, during her tempestuous marriage. Laurence, an attractive widower’s past life holds many secrets that can cause pain to his new bride. The most poignant scenes occur when Gwen becomes a mother. The choices she faces are terrible and life-changing.

There are mystery, romance and an interesting insight into life on a Ceylonese tea plantation. The historical details enhance and authenticate the story. The story has many strong female characters despite the prejudices of the time. ‘The Tea Planter’s Wife’ reflects the beginnings of female emancipation. It illustrates the courage and suffering of our female ancestors believably. The racial discrimination at the centre of colonialism is also highlighted and explored, as is the religious differences prevalent in Ceylon during the 1920’s and 1930s. Prejudice in both these forms force Gwen to make a tragic choice, which is pivotal to the story.

The plot is simple but effective and allows the dramatic, historical setting, powerful imagery and memorable characters to shine.

I received a copy of this book from Penguin Books UK via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

The Tea Planter's Wife

The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Dinah Jefferies

Jane Hunt Writer First Steps
Jane Hunt Writer Book Reviews Facebook
Jane Hunt Writer Book Reviews Google+
View all my reviews